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1997:
Anime director and writer Yasuhiro Imagawa sees a dead end looming in front of the world of anime. Echoing critics of a lot of popular television in America, he sees too much of the same thing being repeated in different shows. Once a show or genre becomes popular, it gets copied to the point that it becomes difficult to tell one show from another; only the names seem different. In terms of technique this has improved things, as each show learns from the previous ones. But Mr. Imagawa sees this as only superficial growth, not the internal growth of stories and themes needed to sustain the art form. A flashy character design and good drawings can't make up for a bad story. As a result, he no longer watches much TV anime.

He spends much more of his time watching American and European dramas cinema which he feels has depth and substance. He agrees that this repetition in anime is leading to a narrowing of Japanese TV audiences' tastes. And like a food bias, this leads to a vicious cycle. Without exposure to other types of shows, audiences are less likely to "brave them" and give them a fair shot. Without confidence in a potential audience, producers are unlikely to make these "risky" shows. So audiences are not exposed to them, and and the cycle continues.

2006:
Q) The animation industry in Japan seems to be stagnant while in China and Korea, there looks to be a comparative amount of growth. What are your thoughts regarding the situation?
A) I concur. The biggest reason I feel so far is the Japanese industry has stopped nurturing their own talents.

2011:
"My great teacher, Tomino, the creator of Gundam, taught me something very important. if you continue to make a copy of a copy of a copy, eventually the image degrades to nothing. Anime has become almost disposable, like a seasonal product. It can hurt seeing something you created selling used for a few yen on Amazon. Us creators should strive to make anime that people will hold onto and love for years."
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He should try making something good before he insults everyone else
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>>101866902
>My great teacher, Tomino, the creator of Gundam, taught me something very important. if you continue to make a copy of a copy of a copy, eventually the image degrades to nothing.
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I wonder how many people here could watch all episodes of Gifu Dodo.
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>>101867939
I did. It was great.
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>Anime director and writer Yasuhiro Imagawa sees a dead end looming in front of the world of anime. Echoing critics of a lot of popular television in America, he sees too much of the same thing being repeated in different shows.

Okay, that sounds logical. What does he propose to fix this problem...

>He spends much more of his time watching American and European dramas cinema which he feels has depth and substance.

>"My great teacher, Tomino, the creator of Gundam, taught me something very important. if you continue to make a copy of a copy of a copy, eventually the image degrades to nothing.

Fucking hell...obvious troll post.
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>Imagawa

Man, I know you are a great director and I really love your shows, but you are the last person in this world to talk about how to make something sell or save an industry.
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>>101868816
He's right.

Nobody watches anime for substance. Anime is mostly about style.
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>>101869818

>Nobody watches anime for substance.

I do. But satly you're right. THe majority of people watch it more for the pretty moving pictures or their favorite voice actor than the actual content of the writing and character development. As can be seen by the amount of sales from ecchi series and the continued obsession of 15 year old dub shows in the west.

But still, there is enough people who actually do watch a show for its substance to not rule them out entirely. As the shows that combine both style and substance still hold their popularity in the long run. Shows like Urusei Yatsura, Sailor Moon, Slayets, Eva, CardCaptor Sakura, Hajime no Ippo, Haruhi, etc.

All those ecchi shows or even a Love Hina won't be able to be revived 5 years later like one of these can.
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>>101871109
>Sailor Moon
>Urusei Yatsura
>Slayers
>Sakura
>Haruhi
>substance
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>>101871210

>greentext
>substance of argument
>>
1997: Anime is dying!
2006: Anime is dying...
2011: ...anime... is dying...
2014: Is anime still dying?
2025: Guys? Still dying? Anime?



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