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File: Traffic-Light.jpg (85.70 KB, 850x454)
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What's the deal with blue also being green in Japanese anyway

Except they also have "midori"

No really what is with that
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>>101338901
Traffic light are sometimes blue so that colorbling people can see them better, but you probably know that much already
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Kanjis and shit.
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinguishing_blue_from_green_in_language#Japanese
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>>101338901
Why do they use so many more tiny lights to make the yellow one than the other two?
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Green wasn't considered it's own basic color in Japan until after contact with the west. It was just a shade of blue. In fact, many cultures around the world, especially in East/Southeast Asia did (or still do) the exact same thing. The term 'midori' for green is a relatively recent creation.
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>>101339123
I'm amazed there's a page on Wikipedia specifically for this
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>>101339495
Well, you'll notice it's a pretty common thing
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>>101338901
It's the color of the sea. They probably picked it back in ancient fishing villages. Who knows why they didn't have the sense to base it off the sky and plants like normal people.
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>>101339211
>Grass and vegetables were blue for old japanese people

That's fucked up man
>>
From what I understand they didn't have orange and pink, either. Certain colours are called "something-colour", like momoiro, which is "peach-color". Japanese peaches are pink. They just use pinku for pink these days.

It's like how we call certain colours based on the objects they are commonly represented in. Such as orange, suede, mahogany, etc.
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>What color is grass?
>Japanese people: blue!
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>>101339702
Remember that translation isn't exact. It's simply as close to the language you're translating to. Ao, for the Japanese, is just a wide spectrum that we perceive as blue, teal and green. To them, ao just means all of them.

However, these days colours are rather important, so clear distinctions are needed.
>>
Who cares about old people. Back then everything was just black and white.
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>>101340163
It was sepia, you racist.
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>>101340199
Sepia is just hipster art
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>>101339961
Goddamn. Why can't grass be blue? Have a blue lawn seems pretty cool.
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>>101339961
Same as Kentucky.
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>>101339961
>being this bad at translating
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>>101340279
>sepia
We already have blue sky, what more do you want?
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>>101340359
Purple leaves and orange clouds.
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>>101340335
Heh.
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>>101339123
Shit, that's actually pretty interesting. I had never known that was a common thing
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>>101340450
there are already purple mountains.
that would get too confusing.
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>>101340450
That contrast.
I want some of what your smoking.
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>>101339944
>From what I understand they didn't have orange and pink, either.
Good. I bet that cuts down on ignorant fucks calling orange a secondary colour.
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As a colourblind myself, this is very interesting.
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>>101340768
Is yellow a primary color?
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>>101339944
Well they have oreenji, but I don't think they use it that much.

It's also weird how they randomly mean 'mind' or 'soul' when they say kokoro.
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>>101338901
aoi can mean both blue and some hues of green.
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>>101340843
Primary or secondary, depending on your perspective (which space is being used). If yellow is primary, then so is magenta, making red secondary. Likewise, yellow and magenta are only secondary if red (along with blue and green) is primary. Either way, orange is tertiary.
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>>101340918
>they have orenji
>オレンジ
Oh gee, I wonder where they got that from.
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Only four color, Black Blue White Red was relevant in ancient japanese culture.
Note that only those four used in manner of いadjective.
青い赤い黒い白い

Sometimes yellow included though.
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Not having words for inbetween colours isn't uncommon. There never used to be orange in the English language until oranges were discovered. It was just red.

Still persists a bit (redheads).

>is Turquoise blue or green?
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>>101341033
>>101340918
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>>101340768
>>101340995
what kind of color scale are you using?
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>>101338990
>colorbling
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>>101341063
Both
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>>101340995
Wait.
But primary colors are colors that cannot be formed by mixing other colors.
How can red be secondary?
we're not talking about paint are we?
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>>101341089
In the first case, he is describing CYMK. In the second case, he is describing RGB.

RYB is simply what children are taught as primary colors. I do not know why they would lie to us.
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>>101340279
>>
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>>101341147

It's real unmanly to sit on the fence like that. How do you expect to win over your waifu being so indecisive?

You don't get 26 episodes to choose between 2-5 girls in real life!
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So, did the fruit orange give the color orange its name or did the color give the fruit its name?
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>>101341161
>>101341265
>>
>>101341265
it's fun to stay in the
YMCA
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>>101340918
>It's also weird how they randomly mean 'mind' or 'soul' when they say kokoro.

That's not weird, that's what the word means.
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>>101341161
That's the difference between additive and subtractive colour. Strictly speaking, based on the way light and human eyes work, only additive colour is 'correct'. That said, subtractive colour is practical and comes in handy. But of course, it's mostly just a mater of perspective; the light coming from a painting isn't magically different than the light coming from an LCD.
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>defining them by color mixing
>not defining them by nanometer wavelengths
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>>101341331
The colour comes from the fruit
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>>101341265

Fuck subtractive and additive. The only color specturm that matters is the wavelengths of common elements as they undergo various reactions.

Cu+o2 is best colour
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>>101341404
700nm is best girl.
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>>101341303
Fine. The hex code of Turquoise is #0FDDAF.

DD is a larger value than AF. Therefore Turquoise is more green than it is blue.
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>>101341404
Robots pls go.
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IT'S THE FUCKING KILL LA KILL THREADS AGAIN
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>>101341404
>clone troopers had blue lasers
>storm troopers had red lasers
>stormtroopers supposedly had upgraded weapons
Good job lucas
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>>101341549

You can't get out of this with SCIENCE, these things have to be decided by the heart!
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>>101341404
You actually can't create some colours using pure spectrum light, they require a combination of multiple.
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>>101341709
But the heart is #000000
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If you study many shades of (natural) blue and green wherever you encounter them, you'll see that they are 2 colors that are actually generally extremely close. Thus in some cultures the word for "blue" (or "green") designates something like a mix of those 2.
Ancient Japanese certainly weren't colorblind or incapable of distinguishing because at the very least paintings dating back to the 16th century contain both blue and green at the same time, so I'm guessing that there was also a word or something to distinguish green specifically whenever needed.
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>>101341644
It's simple actually. Because you see the laser "bullet" (whatever the energy thingys the blaster shoot anyway) as red, it means that it radiates and thus loses less energy than a blue one. So clearly red ones must have more energy in them during the impact (assuming they have the same starting energy).
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>>101341857
I think wikipedia or something mentioned "ocean blue" and "grass blue" or something like that or maybe that was someone here
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>>101341709
>making decisions purely with emotions
Looks like Mendel was wrong, two peas with white flowers can have a purple-flowered offspring if they try hard enough
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>>101341776
Fuck you, nigga.
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>>101342060
That actually might be possible, but we don't know if and how flowers try.
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>>101342201
Where would the purple genes come from?
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i don't really care since i suck at colors anyways

half of them look grey to me
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>>101342326
That's their business.
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>>101342326
The white genes of the gametes would transform due to willpower of course.
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>>101342326
Where do any new genes come from?

The answer is 'spontaneous random mutations'.
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>>101342416
I bet you don't like harem anime, then.
>YELLOW > RED > BLUE > PURPLE > GREEN
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>>101342817
He is saying that is colorblind, asshole.
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>>101342961
"Everything as gray" is a really rare form of it
Most common kind is red-green blindness
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>>101342757
>have beta parents
>expect a child who isn't beta
that's literally what you're saying.
there will never be a harem anime with this concept
the dad will never congratulate his son for sleeping with every woman around him
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>>101343021
Seto no Hanayome?
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>>101339211
In Old English, Orange used to be "geoluread" which is actually "red-yellow". Orange just sounded better, since the fruit was the same color.
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>>101343523
"geoluread" sounds like... fuck I don't know what but it sure as hell doesn't make me think of orange
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>>101342457
Are you a Spiral?
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>>101343770
but what if orange was called gelgoogunge
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>>101343770
That's probably because you are not Old English, in fact, I doubt you are even new English.
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>>101343770
It hasn't been in use for about 700 years, I wouldn't worry too much about it.



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