[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k] [s4s] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Home]
Board
Settings Home
/a/


File: 1385074238043.jpg (43.68 KB, 400x600)
43.68 KB
43.68 KB JPG
Have you given in to the Truth yet?
>>
File: okonogi theory v2.jpg (2.12 MB, 2408x2176)
2.12 MB
2.12 MB JPG
Yes, as a matter of fact I have.
>>
File: 1379269112901.jpg (85.76 KB, 1240x336)
85.76 KB
85.76 KB JPG
Every thread until we reach the Golden Land.
>>
File: 6994994.png (1.13 MB, 900x1295)
1.13 MB
1.13 MB PNG
>>100058228
The truth is simple. I must deito Lucifer.
>>
>>100058383
>he only gets what he wants in the magic end

So he saw all possible futures and determined that he'd only get the cash if Ange believed in magic? Sounds pretty fantastical to me.
>>
>>100058383
I cite Van Dine's 10th and 13th
I could even use 17th

10: The culprit must turn out to be a person who has played a more or less prominent part in the story — that is, a person with whom the reader is familiar and in whom he takes an interest.

13: Secret societies, camorras, mafias, et al., have no place in a detective story. A fascinating and truly beautiful murder is irremediably spoiled by any such wholesale culpability. To be sure, the murderer in a detective novel should be given a sporting chance; but it is going too far to grant him a secret society to fall back on. No high-class, self-respecting murderer would want such odds.

17: A professional criminal must never be shouldered with the guilt of a crime in a detective story. Crimes by housebreakers and bandits are the province of the police departments — not of authors and brilliant amateur detectives. A really fascinating crime is one committed by a pillar of a church, or a spinster noted for her charities.
>>
>>100059089
>The culprit must turn out to be a person who has played a more or less prominent part in the story — that is, a person with whom the reader is familiar and in whom he takes an interest.
He was one of the main villains in Higurashi and speaks to Ange a lot in Umineko. We're familiar with him.
>Secret societies, camorras, mafias, et al., have no place in a detective story. A fascinating and truly beautiful murder is irremediably spoiled by any such wholesale culpability. To be sure, the murderer in a detective novel should be given a sporting chance; but it is going too far to grant him a secret society to fall back on. No high-class, self-respecting murderer would want such odds.
It's not a secret society in umineko, it's just a bunch of bodyguards who decided to cheat the Ushiromiya family.
> A professional criminal must never be shouldered with the guilt of a crime in a detective story. Crimes by housebreakers and bandits are the province of the police departments — not of authors and brilliant amateur detectives. A really fascinating crime is one committed by a pillar of a church, or a spinster noted for her charities.
He isn't bothered by his crime at all.
>>
>>100059696
Yamainu is a counter intelligence agency
If we acknowledge their presence in Umineko using Higurashi as the start of the 'story' then they would still hold this position. Just because the CIA could be set up as body guards that does not take away the status.
Okonogi would not be bothered by his crime, true, however what that commandment refers to, is more along the lines of routine business. A crime without love does not belong in this story.



Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.