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Do I have to be able to draw well in order to sculpt mecha/sci-fi designs?
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>>709425
Kitbashers can't probably draw at all.
So no.
Since you're sculpting though, it would help to know some fundamentals. This goes for sculpting anything reallly.
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>>709425
Not necessarily. It helps. More important is that you can come up with convincing designs that make some sense, looking like they could actually fulfill the role they were designed for. Form follows function and all that. Of course that goes mostly out of the window if you want to do some Gundam type stuff. Even then, your design needs to convey power and weight.
It's also nice if your designs give away their scale, something that's easy to get wrong, especially in sci-fi ships. Details should be purposeful, not just random encrustations of greebles and nurnies. It's also nice to have areas on your design where the eye can rest.
I think the overall most difficult in all this is creating a recognizable and defining silhouette, so that we know what your design is and what it does, even sparsely lit.

Then again, nothing is written in stone here and I mostly have experience with building ships.
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>>709425
no.
A simple sketch to get the basic idea of what you want to achieve is enough, but you can always use some primitives in your program to achieve the same.
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>>709425
As you do more 3d in general, particularly as you start working with reference images and doing shit on your own (as opposed to 1:1 tutorial paint by numbers) the art part of your brain will grow stronger and you'll find drawing is easier
At which point if you want to try and learn some art fundamentals, it'll be less frustrating than when you tried in the past
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>>709425
mech is probably the last thing you would need drawing skills to do.
It is all just simplistic forms, almost no organic forms at all
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>>709425
learning how to draw is always an advantage
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>>709425
>>709432
>>709700
tru
I dont think with mecha u have to know how to draw, mostly what i love the most about mecha when the model is at least somewhat "realistic" and parts have some function and even some visible weakpoints and points where in the worst case could be mecha hit without it just breaking apart. (if we take in mind that mecha is built to not be hit at any time cuz legs= movement = dont get hit or git gud)
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>>709723
thats my autistic view on mecha hope im not the only one
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>>709425
since folks above explained it pretty much I'm not going to repeat it, I'll just give you stuff.
you might find these three books helpful for starters:
https://mega.nz/#!eEtRgQLI!Aj5MwJZceguBD9XmzOUabaGSmx5xYc1SRt6ovYf-T2A
How to Draw - basic information, I suggest starting from this one. it gives information about perspective ruleset, some pointers on how to construct shapes and combine them, and in general gives good shape construction techniques. when you finish this book and practice enough, you will be able to, well, draw.
two books from Sketching series - a(large) series of insights into product designer work. it contains some drawing info too, but it's mostly focused on ideation. I found it's a goldmine of techniques, the tricks they hand out there on how to find new and appealing shape, I still use them to this day because it just works so even if you are not really interested in drawing itself, reading these would still help your creative process.
if you prefer video tutorials more, there are video series from Scott.
good luck.
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>>709425
YES.

There are zero concept artists out there that don't know how to draw, whether they work in 3D or not.
Get a clue, anon.

That question is the equivalent of asking someone if they need to learn the alphabet in order to write a book.
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>>710198
You could say that without sounding like a bitch. I agree in sentiment, but you've got shit execution. Work on yourself and become better than you are right now, because right now you ain't shit and neither is your ego.

>>709425
Basically, understanding how shapes work in 3D space from 2D will help immensely. Work on construction. Hate to use this as a reference because of /ic/'s endless meme, but Andrew Loomis' "I'd Love To Draw!" is a pretty good start. Best of luck, OP. Try and have some fun.
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>>710353
>t. homosexual
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>>710353
>You could say that without sounding like a bitch.

I hope you choke on your next onions meal and die, homo. No one needs you.



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