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Why don't videogames look like this?

This movie came out almost 6 fucking years ago. What the hell is wrong with the games industry?

inb4 consoles.
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>>696507
the answer is consoles
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looks like plastic m80
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>>696507
Gamers are unironically the worst people to deal with and pc gamers are the worst of the worst. Piracy, luddites, old hardware, and an insistence on multiplayer deathmatch shooters on repeat. There are major technical challenges to making 40 hour 60fps games look like 36 hours-per frame pre rendered two 90 minute movies, but the motivation simply is not there. Every singleplayer game gets pirated on day 1, so devs go to consoles with 720p shit hardware. The most profitable multiplayer games are cel shaded ripoffs of other games made with third party engines. Youtubers boycott good graphic games because unfun gameplay. People would rather watch streamers play games than buy and play games themselves. asset store flips. indie retro 2d nostalgia bullshit. Proprietary nvidia implementations. Nvidia paid reviews. Ports of console games. anime loli visual novels take less time to make but make more money. Card games. Pinterest art directors ripping off the ugliest generic designs from other games. chinese state sponsored tencent. expectations of 40 hours of content for 60 dollars or 0 dollars. backlog of old games selling for 10 games for 20$ packs. Single threaded processes. Its a shit show of awful companies and awful customers with no reward for the effort put in. You probably dont appreciate just how good things look given all the forces working against progress.
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>>696507
Modern graphics cards are impressive, but they can't match offline renders taking place on huge server farms over hours or days.
>>696515
Also soft factors like this. Safer and more profitable to produce mtx-ridden mobile games.
I've allowed myself to get slightly hyped for TLOU2, though. The locomotion and combat animations seen at E3 2018 are miles ahead of anything I've played.
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>>696507
Standardized streamlined designs for faster workflow
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>>696515


well with all that considered I guess things aren't so bad looking. As for piracy I can agree that is one of the things that I personally hate is how piratefags take pride in cracking games day 1. I've been tinkering with the idea of an indie game on steam myself (3D first person shooter with fantasy elements, Turok style) but have had all my motivation grind to a halt when I interact with the people who are supposed to be the consumer base. "Gamers" continue to show me how fucking lazy and un-motivated they are to do anything but complain, and it makes me feel like shit considering vidya is something ive always been truly passionate about.


Theres even a lot of hubub right now surrounding an indie dev who "bravely" stood up to the Epic Store exclusivity deals and the dev was showered with love and support. But all the people saying "congratulations on standing up for your princples" didn't actually buy the game and it flopped.
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>>696516

>The locomotion and combat animations seen at E3 2018 are miles ahead of anything I've played

This is why it was a bullshot. They did the same with the last game. Actually metal gear V too.
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>>696507
>Rendered using multiple top of the line quadro GPUs in multiple workstations all running at full load around the clock pumping out roughly 1 frame an hour.

VS

>Consumer grade hardware designed for realtime interaction.

Gee I wonder why people just don't crank their Xbox 360's graphics settings.

Sarcasm aside, Pixar recently released the final files for Toy Story and even on a setup with 4 1080Tis, the movie was still rendering at around 10fps.
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>>696524
they didnt use temporal denoise then, the pinaccle of our industry in current year
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>>696517
>designs
*artsyle
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>>696507
Consoles.
Contracts dictates that the PC version launched CAN´T be superior to the console version, period.
Indie developers who make the PC only version don´t have the dough to make models this high quality without breaking the game loading times and optimization, so that´s that. Wanna see how ultimate PC graphic would really look like? Check Star Citizen in 2077 when it´s launched.
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>>696507
You can make any game look like this:
- Add super aggressive color grading and contrast
- Add super aggressive sharpening
- Add super aggressive noise removal

Done.
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>>696507
You have the technical understanding of a 15 year old, this is why I must ask you to leave this board immediately. Thank you.
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>>696525
Please leave.
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>>696507
Thats why
https://youtu.be/0oyBnjNaS2E
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>>696507
Quantum physics are to blame, you see:
Transistors nowadays are so small that whenever engineers try to make them any smaller, electrons start jumping through the gates even when they're closed, because of quantum uncertainty. That makes them unreliable, prone to errors, and basically useless.

Because of this, computer chips haven't been able to get exponentially better for a long time, and soon they will get as optimized as they possibly can, and your games will not be able to get any better without skyrocketing computer sizes and costs.

Games already have to run billions of calculations 60 times each second, so it's only a matter of deciding how you want to spend that computer power. Either we make games with physics, FX particles, complex gameplay mechanics, and great graphics, or we add more polygons to that dragon you'll only see from two yards away because "whyy the hobbit movie looks better than games fucking morans this is big game indusrty oppressing me"
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>>696507
Gigabytes RAM just for single dragon polygons plus textures, pathtracing with SSS.

https://jo.dreggn.org/path-tracing-in-production/2019/index.html

Nvidia hoping Path Tracing games for 2035+.

Plus massive cost modeling,ring,texture and animate ultra high quality 3D models.
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>>696518
>stood up to the Epic Store

LOL, you sound just like one of those "gamers, rise up" retards you has nothing better to do but bitch about their favourite DRM all day
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>>696999
What's the matter, anon? Did some gamer break your girlfriend's DRM?
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>>696507
A movie needs to look that good to be entertaining, a game does not.
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Why doesn't my 300 dollar PIECE OF SHIT TOY look like a multi-million dollar render in which every pixel obsessively is gawked at and perfected for months by highly paid, world-class artists.
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>>697074
We affectionately call it "pixelfucking"
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>>696973
>quantum uncertainty in transistors
Is this really true?
I'm not talking about some heavy shit at IBM, I mean on the consumer scale.
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>>696515
>Piracy
>Every singleplayer game gets pirated on day 1
You know that piracy basically doesn't affect sales at all, right?
You know that about 60 percent of people who pirate games just wouldn't play the game if there wasn't a torrent of it, right?
You know that about 35 percent of people who pirate games eventually end up buying the game, right?
You know a lot of people move from the first to the second group of people, right?
I'd say that piracy is, in fact, helping the gaming industry in general. If it wasn't, all of these developers (that you say are losing money) would have filed many lawsuits against torrent sites a long time ago, yet they don't.
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>>697104
Yes. That's why we see less improvements in single-core performance, and manufacturers focus instead on putting more cores in each package.
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>>697125
>60 percent of people who pirate games just wouldn't play the game if there wasn't a torrent
Does this imply that 40% would? Because that's a huge number.
>lawsuits against torrent sites
Most of them are hosted in shitholes with no copyright law. The few that have identifiable Western owners have indeed been sued into oblivion. It's truly remarkable that TPB still exists.

You need to keep in mind that publishers are not, in fact, retarded. If the impact of piracy were truly negligible, they would neglect it. They have the stats. For a given region, they can look at sales on platforms that make it hard/impossible to pirate (consoles) and use that as a baseline for potential market size. Then, on PC, they can compare sales for their products with minimal DRM vs. those with Denuvo[1]. They know the figures far more accurately than you do.

(I'm aware that Denuvo is often cracked quickly enough nowadays. It usually lasts for the launch window, which is good enough for this purpose.)

Denuvo/vmprotect/similar solutions are expensive, and result in bad press from a small but loud portion of their audience. If they use it anyway, they have decided that the financial hit from launch window piracy is serious enough to make it worth it.
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>>696507
Devs are lazy and dont want to optimize.
PS3 cell had almost infinite power and devs never used it.
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>>697128
>Does this imply that 40% would? Because that's a huge number.
Yes, and I literally said in the next line that around 35% of the people will actually buy the game later on. I am most definitely included in this category, I simply refuse to pay (((Ubisoft))), or anyone else for that matter, a price near 100$ for a game with all the DLC. I will, however, torrent Factorio for instance, then I'll buy it a few hours later just because the game is great. You could say that torrents are today's demos. You can play the game, but you can't enjoy the full game experience and updates that you get when buying rhe game. The developers are making the games more and more relying on online play, so there's really no point in downloading them, other than for a simple 2-hour long singleplayer "campaign".
>It's truly remarkable that TPB still exists.
Well not really, anon. This brings me to the next thing:
>You need to keep in mind that publishers are not, in fact, retarded. If the impact of piracy were truly negligible, they would neglect it.
Of course, which now brings me to the next thing:
>I'm aware that Denuvo is often cracked quickly enough nowadays. It usually lasts for the launch window, which is good enough for this purpose.
Exactly this, anon. If they wanted to, they could quite easily make a anti-piracy system that works incredibly well. Sure, it would be kind of intrusive, but even you said that the people who mind Denuvo are a loud minority. The fact that they don't have such a system means that piracy is in fact negligible to a certain extent (just for about a week after launch). Hence why it's not weird that TPB is still up; piracy doesn't affect sales that much, if at all.
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>>697131
If you think the Ubisoft game isn't worth its asking price, why do you still feel like you should be allowed to play it? And your example of buying a game "a few hours" later is particularly poor, because all major online stores have refund policies. You could have bought it and got your money back if it was a bad game.

>The developers are making the games more and more relying on online play, so there's really no point in downloading them, other than for a simple 2-hour long singleplayer "campaign"
You are exaggerating and/or playing the wrong games. Although the very best singleplayer games are locked to consoles, unfortunately.

>they could quite easily make a anti-piracy system that works incredibly well
This is not the case. Denuvo and vmprotect are state of the art and very expensive, yet they're still getting cracked faster and faster with each release. Why do you think they could "quite easily" do better? The only absolutely effective DRM would be making the game exclusive to Stadia-style streaming, which I do expect to see in the next few years... thanks in part to piracy.
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>>697136
>If you think the Ubisoft game isn't worth its asking price, why do you still feel like you should be allowed to play it?
Well, piracy still is illegal, so technically speaking, I'm not allowed to play it. I'm saying that the developers qre making weak "anti-piracy" systems that allow me to play it, which profits them in the long run. Sure, some Assassin's Creed games are good, but not 100$ good. In fact, I played through all of them, and I bought almost every single one of them later on.
What I'm trying to say is that the asking price with a lot of games is too high, thus I won't buy the game right away. I'll download it and see if I like it: if I do, I'll buy the game when it's on a discount, if not, I just delete it. If there wasn't a torrent of the game in the first place, I simply wouldn't have played the game at all, unless there was demo/free trial of sorts. This way, the developer can still only make profit from me, there isn't any "stealing" involved.
>You could have bought it and got your money back if it was a bad game
Sure, that is true, but there are some quite high transaction fees where I'm from, I'd still be losing about 5 dollars every time I did it. Also, on Steam, you can play a game for only less than 2 hours to be eligible for a refund. These 2 hours are, most of the time, too short to actually try out a game. Good job to RE7 for actually having a great demo version to test out the game and see how it runs on your system.
>Denuvo and vmprotect are state of the art and very expensive
In theory, sure I'll give you that, but if they were actually trying to stop piracy under all means necessary, they would be WAY more strict than this. Both of these try to find a balance where they can have decent, short-term protection, in a way that doesn't affect certain players such as people who aren't always connected to the internet. They could quite easily up the ante by making the protection much more strict.
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>>697140
>if I do, I'll buy the game when it's on a discount, if not, I just delete it.
I agree with the sentiment, and I do that as well, but I'm not sure it's entirely right. If you test a game and decide it's not your thing, that's alright, but you still spent some time with it. It we accept that the main purpose of games is to entertain, one could argue that you've been successfully entertained for a while, and the game performed well for what it was intended to do. This would be a reason to indeed pay for it, regardless of whether you liked it or not. (Assuming of course that the time spent with it was significant, like the two hours minimum Steam uses.)

It would be akin to buying a book and deciding it was trash after finishing it -- you won't be returning it to the shop. Giving it or selling it second-hand, yes. Which points to an issue with games: you can't get rid of the ones you don't like and get something in return (if you're not gifting them). I think if this were possible, we would see much less piracy.
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>>697145
Well sure, I agree that even a bad game could give you some form of entertainment, but that's not the only thing to take into account really. I mean, if you pay at least 60$ for a game, you definitely should expect the game to be fairly good looking, fun, and well optimized. Well most games nowadays seem to lack at least one of those things. There's no way I'd buy Dishonored 2, no matter how much I liked the story and the gameplay, it runs like garbage and was an awful experience. I don't want to spend 60$ just to find out I don't like the game, or that it runs bad for no reason at all. Now sure, I could find this out before the 2 hour refund time, but for instance, there was a bug in DOOM where the game would just drop from a solid 60FPS to 20-ish FPS, no matter the settings. It was after 2 hours of gameplay, so I couldn't refund it either. Luckily, it was patched, but you get the idea.
>It would be akin to buying a book and deciding it was trash after finishing it -- you won't be returning it to the shop
Sure, I won't be doing it, but if I could, I most certainly would do it. I don't want to support someone who writes trash books. Obviously though, what's good and what's bad is fairly subjective, but a game that makes you grind for no reason is the same like a book that drags out the story too long: it's simply boring. That's why I think it's important that you can try out a game before buying it, but since demos and free trials have been dead for years, torrents are the only solution for now.
>you can't get rid of the ones you don't like and get something in return (if you're not gifting them). I think if this were possible, we would see much less piracy.
Definitely, this coule be a solution to piracy, but I doubt publishers would ever agree to something like that, they'd just say it's not profitable enough for them.
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>>697148
>That's why I think it's important that you can try out a game before buying it

You get a god damn trailer, gameplay trailers, walkthroughs on day one on youtube, 2 hour steam preview, what more could you want you fucking idiot
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>>697149
>you get a pre-rendered cinematic video that doesn't show you anything about the game, short videos where they show only the most interesting features that actually get boring after a few times because you have to grind for hours (which they obviously won't show you), 2 hour preview that takes a certain amount of money even if you don't like the game cause it isn't a normal demo so you have to pay transaction fees for no reason. What more could you want, goy?
I hope you understand that even if you like what the (((publisher))) says about the game, it doesn't have to be true at all. Besides, what you think is the best game may be the worst for me, I have a right to try it out for myself before giving 60$.
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>>697155
>>you get a pre-rendered cinematic video that doesn't show you anything about the game, short videos where they show only the most interesting features that actually get boring after a few times because you have to grind for hours (which they obviously won't show you), 2 hour preview that takes a certain amount of money even if you don't like the game cause it isn't a normal demo so you have to pay transaction fees for no reason. What more could you want, goy?
leaving out the fact that walkthroughs are posted on day 1

tsk tsk
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>>697158
Oh jeez, sorry I accidentally skipped one of your totally baseless arguments that prove nothing, I guess my previous post has absolutely no value now even though I said why your arguments were, in fact, shit.
>here's this video where the guy just runs through the main story as quickly as possible so he can be the first one to upload the videos, too bad nobody will actually play the game like this though, oh and sorry if we spoil the story for you along the way, that's just how it is!
The walkthrough videos are usually (depending on the game) no better than the gameplay videos the publishers show, only now it can actually spoil the game for you.
In any way, it is extremely stupid to pay a premium price for something you have no idea what it's going to be. And just like in one of my previous posts, I said how DOOM started running awfully bad at one part of the game, but apparently no walkthrough showed that, do you think that 60$ was a good price for that experience, or should I know what I'm paying for first?
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>>697162
get a life and get a job, kid. You know how I know you're a kid? Back in my youth of original gameboy, snes and sega genesis we had jack shit. You have tons of options compared to then. Get a fucking job and stop posting here dumbass
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>>697131
The multiplayer is the anti piracy system. Everything can get cracked, there are macro effects of your actions. Devs only get cash from the unenlightened who dont do your piracy mental gymnastics, therefore: most games are dumbed down to the least risky, most benign art that normies will buy. Mirrors edge is a great 2 hour single player game with excellent levels, original artstyle and no replayability. EA sold it for 100$ on release. gamers rise up. Mirrors edge catalyst is a shitshow of five genres smashed together, 40 hours of copy paste content, and microtransactions. If they had made a great, tightly designed linear series of levels, it would have been great, but now everyone wants these retarded dollars per hour calculations so nothing is allowed to be short and sweet. Mass effect 2 was a great bespoke artsy game, with little details in camera placement and lighting for every character dialogue. Some artist put a floodlight on the thirds when you first talk to Tali. Mass effect andromeda has no camera placement, most characters talk to you in third person shoulder view with automatic animation that no artist ever even touched, and its got a deathmatch mode. Valve used to make tight little fps adventure games with obsessive QA and intuitive levels. Now they make phone card games and mobas that take an hour of your life per game. Piracy doesnt kill developers, but its killed genres like the small singleplayer game. Nothing nice is allowed to get made and everyones stalling to run up the clock or add a deathmatch feature. Id like to see an apple-style publisher, that sells $1000 four hour singleplayer games, in contrast to this race to the bottom freemium trend.
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>>697127
That's genuinely a cool problem to have.
I'm not very /g/, but I assume MOAR COARS isn't viable. And I feel like quantum computing is just a buzzword.
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>>697165
For someone who's implying that you're old, you sure seem to act extremely childish. You presented shit arguments, I say why I think they're shit, and you go on to call me a kid. I also played games on the SNES and on the Sega Genesis (Sega Mega Drive over here in Europe), but it's simply idiotic to compare those games to today's standards, I hope you understand how, again, childish it makes you seem if you think they're comparable at all.
>we had jack shit
Oh yeah, there definitely weren't any magazines that essentially had articles about absolutely everything you stated above: walkthroughs, later they sometimes came with demo CDs/DVDs which were the previews, a bunch of screenshots, and so on. Besides, just because the times were arguably better or worse doesn't mean I can't say that today's game industry is shit. Torrents are an old thing anyways, and they're still going strong, if they were such a problem for developers/publishers, they would have done something about it a long time ago.

>>697168
>Valve
God, I really hate them nowadays, they used to be pioneers in the industry, I'd say everything went downhill when they added skins to CS:GO, that's when they realized they didn't have to do anything other than add skins, and they'll be getting bigger profits than ever before without doing almost anything. They ruined CS, they ruined TF2, they ruined Dota, they released some garbage games. I'll give them props for the HTC Vive and that new Index thing, those seem interesting and are a step in the right direction.
>Piracy doesnt kill developers, but its killed genres like the small singleplayer game
Ehh, I don't know about this, anon. I'd say that a lot of people who pirate realize that the developers still need money, so they usually buy games later on. I think it's simply that the publishers saw that it's the most profitable to have a bunch of DLC, loot boxes and other crap, because people keep buying them for whatever reason.
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>>696507
When you're gaming they have to render the graphics live at a smooth constant rate. When rendering the graphics for a movie they can take hours or even days to render a single frame and then just package all the frames up into video format.

Say it took 1 hour on average to render each frame if that movie, you would need hardware 360 times as powerful to have the same graphics in a game
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>>697125
>You know that about 35 percent of people who pirate games eventually end up buying the game, right?
You do realize price drops are a thing, right?
If somebody who pirates a game on day 1 buys it later when the price has dropped, that is still a loss in money.
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>>696515
at least half of this is horribly wrong. The other half is blown out of proportion. How can one motherfucker be so distant from reality?
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>>697851
>If somebody who pirates a game on day 1 buys it later when the price has dropped, that is still a loss in money.
Would that pirate have bought the game if it only was available at full price? I think most pirates simply can't afford the shit they copy.



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