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What programs did they use to make all those soulful 3d renders in 90's?
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maya or softimage.
kys tho.
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>>684491
That image was rendered years before Maya and Softimage was a thing though.
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>>684479

Lightwave on an SGI machine.
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>>684479
It's not about the program, you wanna emulate the look of the 90's you just need to simpler shading. It's all basic blinn/phong with falloff self-illumination.

>soulful

mhmm. Sure you're not just another them dudes imagining it must be so much easier to produce graphics of that type than something more contemporary?
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why did 3D have so much soul back then
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>>684504
SGI is correct but it was 'Alias Power Animator', which eventually turned into Alias Wavefront Maya.

Any contemporary 3D suite can ofc replicate the look tho.
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>>684479
These models that Rareware made used a NURBS system rather than a mesh system, which means it worked with rounded curves and edges rather than polygons, allowing for more smoother shapes at the time. Rareware stills always have that aesthetic due to the lighting and particle engine they used being more advanced when compared to other companies, something that still impresses me for the 90's! Although I was not born until 2000.
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>>684509
Damn you are younger than me and already kno shit. Makes me feel worthless.

Could you post some of your work?
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>>684510
Sure! I'm a Canadian artist who is going to school for this stuff. I've competed nationally in 3D animation twice, and have gotten bronze twice as well!
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>>684512
Shit nig. When you started with 3D? Also some tips on how to learn? What software do you use?

Im 21 and feel like i wasted my life doing nothing useful.
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>>684516
About 3 years ago? Honestly, just practice, choose a program you are confortable with and experiment. Learn about all the textures that go into a model and the UV mesh, and you will go far!
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>>684505
Not OP, but as 8 and 16 bit retro throwbacks become passe, I feel we're going to start mining this aesthetic more and more. Low-poly PSOne-esque graphics are already becoming more and more prevalent, soon enough someone will make an entire game that looks like those strange old pre-rendered cutscenes and ads, clunky animation and all.
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>early 3D
>soulful
Stupid fucking drivel. The thing you actually mean is nostalgia for old stuff and old good times.

The early 3D shit is as bland and soulless as it gets, especially since it was often done by programmers who lacked any artistic skill or artists who were severely hindered by the over complicated but very limited toolset since a lot of tools got programmed on the fly to achieve things. Even shaders had to be scripted and often weren't just clickable like today. But also even modern 3D shit usually lacks any "soul", especially when purpose built for big games etc.
By default, 3D doesn't contain a ton of the human factor since most of it gets automatically computed. For example a drawing gets a lot of its human "soul" vibe through the way the lines are done, the thickness, opacity, where you actually put lines and where not, how you start the lines and end them. Then also the way you shade your stuff has a lot of meaning and compared to physically based computation, your rendering is not perfect and intentional errors can also have a meaning.
3D artwork gets the job done, can look really nice but "soul" isn't to be found in 90% of the times. Hence you see more and more handpainted models or alpha planes that fluff up shit to make it look like a painting and introduce intentional flaws.
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>>684540
(again, not op) I see where you're coming from, especially as I am largely a traditional 2D artist. But I do think there's a certain charm to early 3D in games. Something murky, undefined--people struggling to portray complex visuals and emotions in a medium that seems to be fighting them every step of the way. The attempts and failings of this era are very interesting and appealing to me.
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>>684506
For the most part, only really passionate people would take part in making those. It took much more effort than it does nowadays. But also, it was a novel field. There were fewer established trends, and much more experimentation went on. As a result, "personal touches" were to be found everywhere. It truly was a blossoming era. Nowadays, the Pareto principle is in full force, and the majority of 3D art is made by the book.
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>>684536
People didn't like the look of that early 3D even back then, it's appeal came from the novelty of being able to play games in the 3rd dimension not an appreciation for their aesthetics.

By the time we reach the PS2 age we can start talking about 3D aesthetics that to a degree have stood the test of time and isn't so obv technologically compromised as the early stuff where.
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>>684543
You both misunderstand and generalize here. I appreciate those aesthetics, and I'm betting there are others out there that do as well. The fact that the era was technologically compromised IS the entire charm of it. By PS2 era I am largely bored because everything generally is recognizable and looks at least vaguely like it should. Like I was saying, the journey, the struggle, the first few steps into the medium, is what interests me.
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>>684548
No you don't understand. You claimed 8 and 16 bit aesthetics have 'become passe'like retro gaming is some new thing that tracks the evolution in graphics.
But 2D never been out of fashion and have remained beloved by gamers and artists alike since those early days, even tho we've since moved on.

Within limited pallete/resolution sprite graphics there's a level of mastery and artistic charm that goes all the way back to antiquity and mosaic.
It's an art style that's been appreciated for hundreds of years.

But the early 3D never had that sort of mainstream aestetic appeal with gamers even when it was state of the art, it was all about the novelty and the gameplay.
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>>684479
Trust me, bro. Even if you want that look, you want better tech.
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>>684512
this sweater looks like it has pubic hair glued all over it
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>>684479
There's a digital foundry video that interviews one of the creators of DK and he goes a bit onto the process and the machines that they used to have back then.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQ7qtqqgTlo&t=310s

It's vague and only toe-deep but it's a comfy watch.
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>>684552
It's not the best, I'm still learning, it was something I made 2 years ago or so.
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>>684508
This
/thread
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>>684543
>By the time we reach the PS2 age we can start talking about 3D aesthetics that to a degree have stood the test of time

Thanks to the Japanese and their artwork in those games
>inb4 weeb
animu site.
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>>684501
There was a Softimage before XSI, zoomer retard: Softimage Creative Environment (1989) and Softimage 3D 3 to 4 (1996-2002). The extreme version had one of the first Mental ray implementations and this could have been rendered with it.



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