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Do you make new textures every time or just reuse already existing? What's the percentage of both? How big a material library should be?
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>>665776
>Do you make new textures every time or just reuse already existing?

Lot of things needs highly specific texture that you start with a base one you have and then frankenfuck it with various texture sources until it is exactly what you seek.
Surface tiles of seamless concrete/dirt/grass etc I recycle and expand.

>What's the percentage of both?
Varies, but mostly new or retoched old stuff with some minor pure reuse thrown in.
You keep learning from project to project and your shaders might improve and now need different base value maps etc.
It's an ever ongoing process you'll never finish.


>How big a material library should be?

Keep growing it whenever you come across good source images, you never know when you need something specific.
The more options you have at hand the less you'll have to google later to fill in the blanks.

Over the years I have a couple of hundred curated tileable textures of various materials, but only a subset of those are up to todays standard.
I have thousands of raw images that contain texture source I browse and grab from as needed and touch up in photoshop.
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>>665776
I've almost never gone back into one of my projects to reuse a texture. I have a massive bitmap texture archive that I use and reuse frequently but the textures themselves are just made on the spot. unless is something very complex like this window rain texture I made recently.
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>>665776
I have a massive library from 25+ years of work, mostly high quality stuff and somehow I always go back to older sources and use them in newer projects. I also collect everything I can grab. I always have my cameras ready to shot reference pictures and sources for textures. Considering size; I reached triple TB figures two years ago.
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>>665776
>material library
What? Does this mean that I should be keeping a collection of all the materials I create? How do I export that from one Blender file to another?
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i assumed everyone just made their textures from scratch in photoshop since you can use some decent brushes in it to get certain effects like rust, wood grains, and so on while controlling where everything is placed on one file instead of fiddling with alpha coordinates for a transparent scratch texture on a wall model you know?
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>>665827
File/Append
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>>665776
If it's not already obvious, materials and textures are considered 2 different things. Textures are just images, materials are a combination of shaders and stuff that look a certain way in a 3d program.

In any case...
Textures?
Nah not really. Unless it's something generic/tilable like a road, grass, rocks, or stuff like leather and cloth.
Even then it's always good to customize things as well. I make another map to go on top of it to use as a mask to add things like dirt and stuff to objects. That way you're not messing with the original texture.
Nowadays I just do that within Substance Painter, but you're able to do it within Blender and probably most other 3d packages with a texture paint. Mostly I'll do it in Blender if I don't feel like unwrapping UV's and stuff.

Materials though?
Yeah I re-use a ton. Procedurals are super great. I've got a library of materials I've made myself, and some that I've taken from other places. They're great when you need something quick and easy, and need it to be independent of resolution. I try to use procedurals more than textures because of scalability. I'll still go in manually with some texture paint like before to further customize it and make it look handmade.

I know it wasn't really asked, but just a tip to think about when you're texturing.
It's important that everything you make should have some sort of story. Not shit like "Oh this sword belonged to so and so and that dude got murdered by his rival", that "deep" stuff doesn't really mean much when texturing and making something but things like "It's been used in many battles, or it sat up on a display for years" those things influence how it would look. Would it be dulled, chipped, and worn with age and battle, or would it be pristine from being just a display? Shit like that can apply to most anything, so think a bit about it when you're texturing.
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i hate downloading textures off the internet.
the only time when i do is when i have access to a quality texture archive like substance source or megascans, polilgon does the trick too.

90% of the time i make my own textures with procedurals,because i mostly need simple stuff like wood,plastic,water,metal and that can be done easily within your own rendering engine. and if i can't find a specific procedural i want so simply make it myself in inkscape or photoshop
godspeed anon
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>>665776
>Do you make new textures every time or just reuse already existing?
Always varies. Some objects I can get away with a seamless texture of some sort that I can alter a bit if need be, others are ultimately exclusive to the object Again, it varies between object, let alone projects.

>What's the percentage of both?
Again, always varies, but usually it's almost all reused unless I decide it won't work.

>How big a material library should be?
Depends on your needs. I have a huge one even though I ultimately don't use a whole lot of it. And I feel like it needs a bit of a cleanup, thinking about it.



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