[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Search] [Home]
Board
Settings Home
/3/ - 3DCG



Thread archived.
You cannot reply anymore.




File: 229143470213_2.jpg (62 KB, 320x240)
62 KB
62 KB JPG
Hello /3

I have a college project to do that is due in 8 months.

My ideia was to create a 3d animation of a made up story (about 8 mins).

The project would involve creating the models of the 2 main character + around 12 other characters to act as figurines (would probably just show up once ou twice in the whole video), all the assets like a village, some homes and all of that. I'd also have to get these assets textured.

Along side all of this, the real challange is I'd like to implement motion capture (body and facil) so i can ease the workload instead of animating by hand.

I've been involved in the 3d world for 5+ years but only in moddeling terms.

My questions and doubts are:
- what kind of render or textures should i use for a 3d animation? should i risk vray?
- is there any motion capture software or does anyone know a decent working way to motion capture? (i was thinking ball capture)
- and if its possible to make this project in 8 months - alone (I only study so working 9+ hours daily on it wouldnt be a problem)
>>
>Along side all of this, the real challange is I'd like to implement motion capture (body and facil) so i can ease the workload instead of animating by hand.

why not scale down on the project? seems pretty crazy.
even for me, and iv been doing 3d for 6 years.
if you really like this idea, and you want to see it happen, i suggest you pick your shots carefully and don't render anything that is not needed.

>what kind of render or textures should i use for a 3d animation? should i risk vray?

does not matter. all render engines are good nowdays.
the only thing you should be worried about is how many render samples are required for each shot, meaning: will your scene have an actual sun in an open area, are there gonna be alot of small lamps or reflective objects, are there many foliage and meshes to render? if the answer is alot or yes, then maybe use a real-time render engine like UE4,EVEE or octane. the shadow/light quality will be a bit worse but will still look amazing if everything goes according to plan.

>is there any motion capture software or does anyone know a decent working way to motion capture? (i was thinking ball capture)

i can't answer that question, maybe ask someone else?
if this is a real college projects, wouldn't you want to test your own animation skills? or the animation part is not the thing you want to focus on.

>and if its possible to make this project in 8 months - alone (I only study so working 9+ hours daily on it wouldn't be a problem)

absolutely yes. but keep in mind that your concepts and direction have to be firmly set before you do anything, its easy to get lost when you constantly scale up the project as you go. make sure to have attainable goalposts
>>
Scale it way, way down.
Creating a good, functional story spanning 8 min is fucking hard and takes way more time than u might think. My advice, from personal experience, keep it short, 4 min max (even 3 desu) but shoot for the highest achieveable quality.

Regarding animation:
Motion Capture can be useflul but dont forget that u have to clean the animation quite a lot and regarding the overall capture some of it might no be useful anyway. Regarding facial captruing... idk..., imo, you should scratch that idea. Capturing facial animation and "translating" it is pretty hard and often times animating by hand is just faster/simpler.

All in all, good luck, but pls, just dont go for a 6+ min story, the danger of it being lackluster and dragging is just too damn high.
>>
>>649858
>- what kind of render or textures should i use for a 3d animation? should i risk vray?
If you're worried about time constraints, use procedural textures wherever you can, so that if you need to revise a model, you don't need to recreate the material from scratch.
>- is there any motion capture software or does anyone know a decent working way to motion capture? (i was thinking ball capture)
Setting up mocap and then actually doing it and then tweaking it is probably going to take you longer than animating by hand in the first place.
>- and if its possible to make this project in 8 months - alone (I only study so working 9+ hours daily on it wouldnt be a problem)
Sure, but it depends entirely on the level of quality you intend to achieve.



Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.