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I'm a noob at coding and have yet to download it, but I absolutely hate blueprinting as it's horribly complex. I feel more comfortable coding my ue4 game, my question is what possible things can I do with c++ in ue4?

Could I come animations, expressions, movements, interactions? Just what can I do with c++ for ue4?
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>>635850
you have to learn eather blueprints or c++, you can do anything with c++, its a main language of ue4
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>>635850
you have source code access. you can do anything if you know what you're doing
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>I'm a noob at coding
>goes for Cpp

>blueprints
>horribly complex

A U T I S M
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>>635850
Anon, learning to use blueprints is easier than learning to use C++, if you already code in other language then using blueprints should be pretty simple, and if this is your first attempt to learn how to code in Unreal, I still recommend you to learn blueprints, it's faster, easier and you get basically the same results as using C++

But if you still want to learn C++ I can tell you that you can do whatever you want as long as you understand how Unreal is programmed, first understand how the developers access the data they want and how they make references and then you can do anything you want
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>>635882
Cpp being too complex for beginners is a meme.
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>>636041
Would definitely go with Python first for absolute beginners. You still need for Maya anyway.
But yeah, once you have programming basics laid down you can learn whatever language you want.
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>>636043

> Python

Go C# not at all hard for beginners and you have a great engine where you can do pretty much whatever you can imagine.
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>>636066
Python is an excellent language for beginners and it's perfect for scripting. Maya, Max, Houdini, Blender, Nuke, etc. all rely on it. It's also great for little scripts and automation. It's not for video game programming of course because it's slow, but it is a wonderfully comfy and well thought out language for its use cases.

Anyway this thread is kinda dumb, if you don't know what C++ is for then you should start by writing blueprints. When you hit the limitations you'll understand why people use C++.
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>>635882
desu I code in C++ and blueprints are needlessly complex 90% of the time if you want to do something just a little outside the box. Also compiled blueprints are still 10x slower than some half decent C++ code.
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>>636106
>Python is an excellent language for beginners and it's perfect for scripting.
This. Putting together a prototype of a complex function just to see if it'll work is hella fast and easy in Python, een if you'll be going for another language for the final thing.
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everyone's been bamboozled here,this shit is pasta and i saw it on /v/ already,just sage it
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In two words: Blueprint - presents ( class templates and functions that UE4 build for you to manipulate nodes in way if it's being "code", like houdini fx in general ), CAN'T create new functions or classe;
C++: Can build own shit, also can build own classes and function that later can be used as "BluePrint" nodes if necessary

hope you understand my england
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>>636106
>>636168
>spend 1000 hours reworking your prototype code while I can literally just connect a wire to another graph and be done with it.
>b-but at least I can do simpler stuff quicker

I thought programmers were supposed to be smart?

>>637187
You can definitely create your own classes and functions with blueprints tho.
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>>635850
Didn't you already post this on /v/? Please tell me you've learned something between these posts.
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Epic just have to get with the times and switch to managed environment instead of retarded macro shit they they slapped on already shitty language. "reflection" my ass, "generated_body" my balls
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>>635850
>blueprints are complex
>wants to code in cpp

are you a kind of retard?
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if you grasp c++ but can't understand blueprints you have brain damage
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Not /3/, ask /v/ (where your filthy kind belongs)
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I want to learn Python for C4D, Vex for Houdini and C# for Unity all at the same time.

Good idea or am I going to fuck myself sideways?
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>>640093
Python and C# are really similar from what I heard.
No clue about Vex. But the more languages you know, the easier it is to pick up more. This works for both spoken language and computer language. Just learn one, then move to another when you feel like your skills are good enough in that first one. If you already know multiple programming languages, I guess you'll be fine.
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>>640093
>am I going to fuck myself sideways?
yes?
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>>635850
>Blueprint
>Complex
Anon, I...
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>>640093
I would suggest you learn C up to a point where you are familiar enough (*enough*, not a true pro) with all the concepts involved in general programming at that level. This book: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_C_Programming_Language is great for that.

VEX is very C-like, so learning C helps you lots. (Plus C is the lingua franca of computer programming, so that's another advantage.) Python is not quite like C, but writing it is easy peasy if you know C. You can actually read the docs in a couple weekends, get the syntax down, and be ready to go. The key is to have practiced how to solve problems algorithmically, and you'll learn by practicing a kinda low-level language like C.

I don't have much experience with C#, I can't comment on it. But I would anyway suggest to learn it after learning C.

C, C, C. Yeah, I know, I keep saying it. But trust me, it's a good way to learn, and opens many doors.

On another note -- why learn C4D if you intend to work at VEX level with Houdini? Houdini practically replaces C4D in all aspects, offering you more flexibility at the cost of having to put in a bit more of work, except perhaps in the modeling department -- and, from what I know, C4D isn't the king in that regard either. If you decide to not learn C4D, Python is still useful for pipeline management and tool creation with Houdini (it's replacing HScript, its previous scripting language).

So... I would say, C / Python / VEX-Houdini / C#-Unity is a great combination, and perhaps even better if you are inclined to add a bit of Substance and ZBrush to the mix. I'll take time, but I believe it would be worth the effort.
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>>635850
>I'm a noob at coding
Indeed you're. Nobody codes behaviour in code anymore. Learn about data-driven <put your favourite word here>.
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>>635850

The best thing to start coding with is something simple like Python or Actionscript 2. You'll learn syntax and datatypes, along with their properties and methods. Once you know how to do that and then apply logical/mathematical operations, you can pretty much do anything, kiddo. The thing that makes all the big languages scary are the namespaces and implementations and stupid shortcuts devs have made over the years. You can ignore that with a simple, out-of-the-hood baby language.





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