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Is old school modeling still a thing people do in this day and age for medium to high poly pieces? Is it worth actually getting good at modeling, or is it all about that sculpting -> retopo workflow? I love the idea of modeling, but it seems so hard to manage the kind of vector density you need for high poly stuff (even medium poly, these days).

Don't get me wrong, sculpting is fun and all, but it just seems like such a cool skill to be able to actually model shit.
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>>635393
>Is old school modeling still a thing people do in this day and age for medium to high poly pieces?
Some people do, especially for hard surface, but I personally don't see a reason for it other than preference. Then again, there are people who are outright little wonders with it and they can create anything in near perfect topology with just a few clicks. I mean you could do anything you want with stuff like Zmodeler if you're some prodigy.

I think to really create a really detailed character with poly modelling , which needs only little refinement in the normal map department, you need to have gigantic expertise with the modeling tool + extensive knowledge on what goes and what goes not in your final maps. Basically you need to have the entire character already assembled in your head before starting to model, and I imagine this is rarely the case, especiall when you're dependent on the input of a director/lead.
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>>635410
>especially for hard surface
I should've clarified: I'm concerned with organic modeling.
>Basically you need to have the entire character already assembled in your head before starting to model
But this seems pretty standard, no? You'll always have drawn reference before you start to model, and often before you start sculpting too.
>when you're dependent on the input of a director/lead.
Especially in these cases, where there are often whole concept art departments and shit.

I guess the real major roadblock for modeling is bumpmapping, right?
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I'll make it short:
Don't be a fucking Z-Brush Cowboy.
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>>635415
>I should've clarified: I'm concerned with organic modeling.
You can organic model with subdiv modeling.

>But this seems pretty standard, no?
Only because you don't know any better. With box modeling + modifiers you can be completely procedural in your approach

And I know your next question will be "Why would I want that?" and the answer is "Because you're going to spend more time iterating over a character with your art director or producer or boss than you will actually making the character"
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>>635457
I agree. A girl I know is a prodigy when it comes to Zbrush, but a complete retard regarding anything else
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>>635415
>You'll always have drawn reference before you start to model, and often before you start sculpting too

That is like 30% of the time. Rest of the time is "Make it 50% cooler! Change the boots I don't like them! The hair doesn't fit the character, Change the outfit! It doesn't look real enough! It looks TOO real now"
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mobile game
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>>635457
>ZBrush Cowboy
So I gather that this term basically means someone that can sculpt in ZBrush, but that's the extent of their abilities. Everything else past that, retopology, rigging, animating, maybe even texturing they are unable to do. Is that correct?
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>>635769
Yep, that's it.
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>>635769
Yes, exactly.
Cowboys loose out every-time there is somebody who knows more than Zbrush (which means very often).
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Honestly I have learned to prefer packages that let you box model, subD, and sculpt at the same time.

Used to be an industry 3dsmax fag, now I actually prefer blender for organic modelling precisely because you can tab out of edit mesh right into sculpt brushes. Poly count limits are high enough these days to allow it.

Zbrush is still king for characters though. For serious assets like a boss for a game the sculpt-retopo-bake method simply cannot be beaten and always gives the best results.
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I have literally never seen someone make an appealing model while box modeling. There's always something just slightly off about the model. Learn how to sculpt, when you want to play with verts/polys retopo.
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>>635898
where's your god now you fucking noob?
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>>635949
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>>635953
god i wish an anime grill would throw up on me
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>>635898
t. asshat
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>>635898
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFqopkUTO0Q
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>>636047
Ushiyama is a great example of a 2D artist trying 3D in his late 30s/early 40s and being instantly good at it. He now holds lectures at art schools and writes for 3DCG magazines.
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>>635954
pedo
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You still need old school techniques to create the base structure for your sculpts
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>>635898
how the fuck do you get a low poly mesh then
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>>635898
look at this fuckin loser lol





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