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File: zbrushpractice.png (188 KB, 814x790)
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Is mastering 2D drawing necessary in order to sculpt better/like a professional?
My drawing level is amateur at most; I moved into 3D because I liked the "feeling" of creating a model, plus creating 3D models was my goal since the beginning.
I just hate drawing because its boring to me.

pic related is my work.
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Yup.

Next, please go to door >>626444 !
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>>629549

I would argue no.

The problem your having is one of fundamentals.

Just sculpt the skeleton. Pick up Paul Richer and Anatomy for Sculptors.

Then just sculpt 16 hours a day. Then, you will become good
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From personal experience yeah, it does help.

Practicing drawing makes your hand strokes better which translates directly onto your sculpting, relaxes your creative mind by playing around on other non-3D medium, and is also a great way to learn anatomy.
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>>629552
I made a thread because I thought it would be a good subject to discuss
but if I have questions next time, I'll go there
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File: study1.png (353 KB, 892x656)
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Also here's a demonstration of my drawing skills.
I feel like the lines are fine sometimes but I notice I go over some lines multiple times (like below the chin).

I just want to avoid drawing I guess because I hate it. I would rather sculpt.
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>>629553
>Then just sculpt 16 hours a day. Then, you will become good
I like the precision and vagueness of both statements in tandem.
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>>629557
>I just want to avoid drawing I guess because I hate it.
You could try to learn to like it. It's entirely possible, if you see for yourself that it helps you progress on your sculpting.

Try something like this: Pick two similar anatomical features, like an arm and a leg in certain poses. Going with this example, sculpt the arm from reference, then the next day draw it from reference focusing on the forms, then next day sculpt it from reference again. Now try with the leg: sculpt it from reference, practice it again by sculpting the next day, and finally sculpt it again on the next day. After this, put your first and second sculpts of the arm and the leg side by side, and compare between them: did drawing help you learn better sculpting with the arm as opposed to what just practicing by sculpting did for the leg? If so, draw. If not, well, just sculpt.

Granted, it's not a scientific test, but it may be personally insightful for you.
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>>629559
>first and second sculpts
*first and last sculpts
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>>629549
You don't need to master drawing. Just make sure you do it and use it to study the forms and shapes around you that you'd like to sculpt. I highly recommend the tutorials by Sinix Design on youtube, he explains drawing by mostly highlighting the shapes that go underneath, muscles, fat that kind of stuff. It's helped me study organic forms better.
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>>629549
If you plan to have your own characters and signature style, you HAVE to master drawing.
If you´re just going to model standard DAZ people, cars and buildings and have a regular job for a regular life, then you´ll always need an artist to do the 2d for you. Also, having a signature style means everyone will recognize your work, anywhere, even if you don´t wan´t to. Pic related, i bet some anons already know who i am.
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>>629581
I give you that, it is recognizable.
But also bad.
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unironically yes
if ure already very good at 2d art uve already overcome all the hurdles and 3d is just a matter of learning the app.
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>>629549
Yes, the mastery of illustrations and life art are required for any form of 3d modeling and sculpting; especially when you recognize the form and construction of said object.
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>>629581
this is a joke, right?
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>>629581
Did you take your inspiration from this?
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>>629581
I haven't seen your 2D before. It looks great. How is your 3D so fucking ugly in comparison?
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Id also say yes, 2D helps a lot. When I picked up drawing and learning anatomy my 3D proportions and structure improved vastly. Also the top tier pros have extensive backgrounds in traditional 2D animation.

My favorite book is Michael Hamptons Figure Drawing Design and Invention. Lastly, id be very wary of tempting to go to /ic/; I stopped going there a few years back when it became the embodiment of "crabs in a bucket".
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>>629549

Knowledge and Fundamentals (most) transfer from drawing to 3DCG.

It's not necessary to master 2D drawing to be good at 3D.

But fundamentals such as Construction & Form, Proportions, Perspective and Anatomy do transfer as long as you know how to actually use the program. Although Perspective is automatic in 3D, knowing how to construct primitive shapes and forms on 2D does healpt greatly when going to something like 3D sculpting.

There are basic shits like building your dexterity and hand eye coordination that goes across the board from 2D to 3D.


How long have you been working on that pic related?
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>>629644
Are you joking? That 2d looks even worse.
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>>629549
I would say maybe not mastering but being familiar with drawing is kinda important, I'm no expert but i do enjoy studying the intricacies of the human body. I know for a fact that Rafael Grassetti doesn't draw and he's a fucking master sculptor for example, so it all comes down to you finding what works for you i guess, that could very well not include drawing at all. pic related some of my drawings.
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>>629581
That one anon who hates necks.
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>>629653
Hampton is the best. I wish someone had given it to me ten years ago.
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>>630143
better?
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>>630175
her mouth looks like spongebob's when he gets excited, it's honestly fucking disgusting. why are her cheecks like that
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>>630175
Its not your 3d work, heck its not even your 2D work. Your style just doesn't function anywhere. That face looks horrible man, like some sort of horrible uncanny monster. Even in 2D. Its not appealing at all. Would be good for horror tho.
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>>629583
>>629599
>>629607
>>629644
>>630053
>>630182
>>630204
Holy shit, that´s why nobody will never post anything in here
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>>630213
yes it's important to post your work so other anons can give you a much needed reality check.
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>>630222
...aaaand where´s yours, anon-kun?
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>>630236
Does it matter whether others post it or not?
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>>630236
Here I already posted it.
>>630072
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>>630213
When an amateur has the hubris to state that he's mastered drawing, one is morally obligated to take him down a notch.
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>>629581
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>>630267
A /3/ amateur. People think they're so great on here just because they know how to use substance painter (which objectively is pretty easy once you get the hang of it)(((getting good results however is another story)))
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>>630213
Cry me a river. Now he knows it's eyewateringly bad he can improve. If you lie to him and tell him he's great a la deviantart comments section, he will never improve.
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>>630175
GOTTA BLAST
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>>630175
well now she has a neck, so yes. I wonder if everyone pointed out all the flaws you would be able to improve your models just like you did there.

I honestly don't know if you don't see problems yourself, or you give up on your characters and never fix them.
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You need to understand how physical forms and anatomy work, but you don’t necessarily need to be good at drawing.

I can’t draw for shit but I can model pretty well in clay, plastic, and 3D. Shape and form are more of a ‘tactile’ thing than a ‘visual’ thing to me, so I shape things the way they feel, but it’s harder to do this in 2D.
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>>630350
>Shape and form are more of a ‘tactile’ thing than a ‘visual’ thing to me, so I shape things the way they feel
Do you kind of feel the "weight" or "solidness" of objects, so to speak, when you model them? I think I do, but perhaps it's my brain playing tricks. Never asked anyone, nor heard it mentioned before.




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