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File: Stone 4chan.png (1.82 MB, 1920x1080)
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This is the first time I have created a hand painted texture from scratch.I would love some feedback.
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its ok, but too segmented. looks more like quartz than rock
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Looks ok for early access game
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>>624947
Doesn't look bad, though there are a few things.
How high is that texture resolution?
You're going to run into problems if you can't keep that texture density on larger objects.
The cuts are too pronounced. This doesn't look like natural wear and tear, but rather someone cut this rock to this exact shape on purpose.
The green color would probably suit a rock in a cave or on the beach better than in a field or mountain side. If this thing is going to be near grass then you'll probably want more blue or red tint.
The strokes seem a bit too uniform in certain areas (No variation in size/pressure) and also a bit messy. (Lines overlapping each other, not filling in their area completely)
Also I hate to be that guy, but post in the WIP thread next time.
Keep at it anon.
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Thank you all for the critiques.
The resolution of the texture is 1024x1024.
I will be redoing it according to the tips mentioned here and will post it in the appropriate thread.
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>>624947
I think you made a great looking leaf OP but that sadly is not a rock
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>>624947
Don't give a stylized rock hard edges on the texture if it has a rounded shape like that.
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Looks like cabbage
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>>624947
Seen a lot of rocks in my time, rocks are grey, hope that helps.
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>>624949
kek
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>>624947
Does this have spec/gloss maps? Giving each face a different value would make it look more jagged.
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>>624947
natural rocks tend to form in the shape of layers. As these layers erode they do not form "wear marks" as seen on typical renderings of firearms, but they chip away at the surface, breaking off and exposing other layers.

Almost every rock has a "grain structure"--which we can simply define as an obvious pattern of semi-parallel lines. This grain structure is exposed through the aforementioned erosion and is what you should be focusing on when modeling wear and tear on rocks.

River rocks are different.

I suggest you create photogrammetry assets of real rocks and try to reproduce them in a sculpting application. Think of it as studying anatomy.
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File: 1486261039270.jpg (99 KB, 314x262)
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>>624947
>edge wear on all the actual topology edges
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>>624947
There is next to no reason for you not to have a highpoly/sculpt for handpainted, stylized assets.

Big studios working with stylized like Blizzard sculpt/HP model their assets nowadays. It's a much easier workflow as you can draw some lighting and curvature information from your normal map after you bake, and use it to start your textures.

While there are some people that are capable of painting directly onto their lowpolys, it's an extremely difficult technique to master without any art experience, and is a futile waste of time for any beginner.

https://www.artstation.com/artwork/ZwORx
Here's a tutorial which explains the technique.
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>>624947

It's flat. Try to make the specular edges less uniform so they don't look like a web and try to accentuate the major edges. Indicate the plane breaks by giving the more vertical planes of the rock a darker value.
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>>628377
they look like carved or chiseled miniatures




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