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Has anyone ever considered making their own 3D animation company? Like another Pixar, Disney Animation, or Dreamworks? Why aren't more people doing it when there's so much money to be had?

Is it a funding issue? I feel like it can't be. As long as you make a decently good movie it seems like distributors would love to work with you -- Animated films almost always do extraordinarily well. We could totally find an investor to back this, it's not the stupidest idea.

A talent issue? Yeah I get it, it's hard to get the right team of people together, and pipeline the whole process properly, but it seems like a small hurdle given the longevity of the effort.
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Financing it is the problem.

Movies require huge amounts of money for marketing and theatrical distribution.
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>>622624
But look at the amount of money you can potentially receive in return! Is it so implausible to find the financing for it?

The production is the only "real" upfront financial cost. Marketing and distribution are usually left to the distributor, as I understand -- am I mistaken?
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No talented person is going to work for cheap on a feature length film to completion.
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>>622626
banks are not going to lend money to some random upstart studio with $0 sales and $0 in assets. and a distributor is not going to pump tens of millions into some random upstart studio.

look up film finance. banks do big collateralized deals with the big studios where they can't lose money even if the film bombs.
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>>622627
I agree and I'm definitely not saying they should.

Gather up some investors for a few million dollars and talented individuals can be compensated pretty well, if it's not market rate it would certainly be around it. With stock options to sweeten the deal too, you know?
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>>622630
You need competent storyboard and concept artists, and a known successful writer to make something first.
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>>622629
I'll look up film finance, but I don't think banks are a great route either for the reasons you've outlined.

The bay area has a crazy high-risk investment community that isn't tied to any bank mechanism. Good ol' equity in exchange for goold ol' cash. I'm not saying it would be easy to find the right people that are willing to take that risk, but I'm dreaming about it; I think it's possible.

I'm more concerned about the distributor, I suppose. It's hard to say whether they would pump that money.

So maybe think smaller at first. Maybe connect with Netflix, start an obligation with them, and get some identity in the world? I feel like they have a lower barrier to entry than traditional distributors, they're hardcore about seeking good content right now.
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>>622632
I've touched a lot of people with this idea and I think competent artists are well enough to come by, anecdotally. I'm not as worried about that.

This board is a great example of the amazing resource pool -- Look at all the 3D talent on here waiting to have purpose. There's boards and online communities just like this one for specialized artists.

I think I need a successful story. I think a well-acclaimed book would be easier to find than a successful writer working full-time, for the first film anyway.

Or if that's total bullshit maybe it wouldn't be as hard as we think to find a successful Hollywood writer. Who doesn't want to be a part of the next Pixar?
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>>622622
If you hadn't wasted all of your dad's money on expensive cameras and iPhone 10s I would have had something left to give you to try to start a company. Yes, it's your dad here.
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>>622635
The only camera I own is my shitty samsung galaxy camera. Hi dad
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>>622633
oh yeah dude just call up netflix with your 5 friends, theyll totally give your unproven studio millions in cash.
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>>622636
I'm the dad of the guy obsessed with "photogrammetry" I think it's called. I'm sorry if it's not you but I'm so disappoint in my son and I know he hangs around here.
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>>622637
I dunno. I know you're being facetious but that's sort of how these things work sometimes.

By the time we're ready to talk to Netflix we'd have an angel round I'm sure. We could prove a little something by then.
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>>622638
nah, looked it up though, that's cool stuff. Terrible name though
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>>622644
>that's sort of how these things work sometimes
ON TV
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>>622622
Planning another Foodfight!, are we anon?!
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I want/going to make music video. That's my next personal project..
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start a Youtube channel, build your brand, then move into feature work
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Pixar opened up a studio in Tenerife recently. I've got a picture on my wall of the island and I'm working on my Spanish every day. That's my life goal. Work for a big animated movie studio somewhere nice. Living in the uk so it's going to take a lot of work. But thats what motivates me to get out of bed in the morning and what drives me throughout the day.
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>>622790
Are you sure it's a Pixar studio?
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>>622804
Yup. They posted a private job application listing on LinkedIn not too long ago. It is closed and hidden now though so something secretive must be going on. Either way theres a bunch of animation sutdios on tenerife. Disney/pixar/dreamworks/sony animations ecs. I don't mind. I just want to work on the big movies.
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>>622807
never mind. It isn't hidden. Here you go
https://www.linkedin.com/search/results/content/?keywords=Pixar%20spain&origin=SWITCH_SEARCH_VERTICAL
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>>622649
In real life too.

Investors put a lot of risk on more insane ideas.
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>>622790
Is it the opportunity or the island that moves you? Would you hate working in the SF bay area?
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>>622622
>As long as you make a decently good movie
Sure, just make a good movie, so easy.

>Animated films almost always do extraordinarily well
For every billion dollar pixar movie there are 50 animated flops that never even made back their budget.

and you are underestimating the ridiculous amounts of money, infrastructure and top level talent required to even start such a studio, let alone hire enough people to make a movie.
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>>622821
This, seems like you have no idea how much failure is common in this industry.
There's a shitload output of animated movies, most of them are failure like this one : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8P5RrtCm7Q
Glaring technical issues + lack of a good screenplay + lack of creative thinking.
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>>622823
It wouldn't have tanked if it were titled "Richard the Birb".
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my idea would be instead of trying to imitate the big studios you should go for a style that is very easy to produce but also has a certain appeal, something like early south park, not exactly the style but the idea of how to create emotions and jokes with barebones animation and rendering. if you do you have to put more effort in other things thought. mainly the sound, voice acting, dialog and the rules you set for your world that make sense and allow you to cut back on animation without losing the appeal of your style.

other than south park there are also a few more 2d examples on adult swim that got popular without having anything close to great animation.

when it comes to 3d though the only example i can think of is xavier renegade angel. if you take that look, make the plot a bit more mainstream and use a little creative trickery to do as little animating as possible (just look at how anime uses filler techniques to stretch out episodes) then you got something that costs almost nothing and can be sold or turned into a patreon thing.
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>>622811

Insane ideas that are new and unproven and might just work.

"I want to make a movie" is not a new idea, and it's proven to be a money sink in 99% of cases where it isn't studio backed.
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>>622634
>This board is a great example of the amazing resource pool

There are no words to signify how hard I laughed at this.

Going to start the Moving Donut company and churn out a 30 second ugly Cycles donut promo reel after 3 years and $125m?
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R8 my work m80
https://youtu.be/zZaWlA-TWfo
Huehuehue
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if youre serious abot this yeah, you can do it but you neeed to be driven and have talent. if you have somerhing to offer. a good script, good concept art and a clear idea of what you want you can pitch it. start with friends they can speal of thw project to other people and so and so on. i met this guy whos been doing his personal since like 2-3 years with a shitload of artists around the globe and hes living of that. yoi can achieve that kind of thing but you gotta be driven. theres always new animation studios, theyre just small and work for others making their stuff but theres always new one coming to the top like that french one that made the minions and those gru films.
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>>622622
Getting financial backing is hard to do. You can attempt kickstarter but you are looking at a small fortune to make a movie.

It's even harder to get funding if you have nothing to show as proof that you can undertake such a underproject.




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