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>>
I don't get it
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life like texture ;_;
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>>593878
Damn, has it been that long? Well, at least they found their fortune in GIS, it only took them forever to realize that there was already a market working with the kind of datasets they were showing off.
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>>593878
CGI as a whole is still young. This notion that everything and anything needs to be hyper-realistic is fucking retarded. Games still look like shit, movies do too. Pictures look like shit. Sure we've come a long way but give me a break. These expectations are fucking dumb
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>>593882
Some Australian company one day came out of nowhere claiming to have developed a system for displaying “infinite detail”, and rather than utilizing polygons or any other traditional for of geometry, everything was a point-cloud, so as long as you had the data density, you could zoom in from a distant view in to a granule of sand.
The videos were too long, had cringe as fuck narration, and did a poor job of explaining the tech, which of course made them go viral immediately. It also didn’t help that they were targeting it as a challenge to exiting computer graphics technologies in general.
The company then went on to disappear and reappear several times over the years with new improvements just in time to quiet the people shouting vaporware and hoax.
The biggest problem with the tech was that it had no malleability, the point-clouds have to be stored as a database for the renderer to look up the corrisponding screen pixel and trace the color of the fragment, so anything created with this system is completely static. The advantage is that it does work, and a shitty laptop with no GPU can render an image at 60fps.
Ultimately they began selling their tech to companies in the geographic and oil industries, where you need to be able to churn through terabytes of point-cloud data as fast as possible. All of a sudden their tech made sense, as not only could you do so on a basic computer, but you could even stream the needed data fragments from a central server and render the data on your end.
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>>593925
Name of the company?
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>>593925
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5AvCxa9Y9NU&t=4s

Euclideon
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>>593930
Nice. This is now a time capsule of cringyness.
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>>593925
I was so glad when they stopped trying to push it as video game technology. It had applications, but video games were not one of them.
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I'm getting too old for this
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>Ratings disabled
>Comments are disabled for this video.

LMAO.
This is insta-proof for if a video is complete bullshit. No exceptions.
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>>594059

REMEMBER ME??
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>>595716

10,000 Man-hours.
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>>595716
Shit man this takes me back.
https://youtu.be/bHj8SbH3x7s
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>>595744
>https://youtu.be/bHj8SbH3x7s
It screams "generic run-of-the-mill western military sci-fi" in a sickenly obscene way




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