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Hey guys im sorry phone posting from work. I decided this week I need a hobby and want 3d to be it.

I have simple goals for the next couple years and would like help. I am going with blender since its free and im poor as fuck.

Have a decent computer. Had to take a used gpu from a friend but otherwise its all new. Can anyone just point me to what I should watch/read in order to get going and how readonable my goals are?

Goals:

3months: be able to model a character and random objects around me to a reasonable degree of skill.

6months: rigging a character and performing simple animations (handwaving, walking, action moves of some description like punching or doing a flip.)

1 year: short 5-10min video

5 years: full videogame assets, friend is learning gamedev and weve known eachother for years. If it falls through id like to just be better at the type of thing involved in year 1 goal.

Ill do whatever it takes Ill sit through the tuts and bash ky head against stuff I just eant to learn. Is the donut thing the best place to start? Any info on general 3d knowledge I should look into?

Ill be checking regularly from work so please ask any questions you have in order to make helping easier.
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>>593816
as long as you keep at it it's not too hard
it may get frustrating sometimes as you may have to delete and redo a lot of shit, but you keep at it and its rewarding
as for what software to use, never pay money for something that wont make you any money
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>>593816
>I am going with blender since its free and im poor as fuck.
Don't forget that you can always pirate shit. I'm getting this out of the way first, because I'm sure everyone else here will pile in to tell you the same thing. As always, I recommend trying out several programs, and picking the one that feels the best to you, as the one you're comfortable with is the one where you'll get the most work done.
You might still end up liking Blender, but these days it's also kind of expected for you to supplement your work with stuff like ZBrush and Painter, so sooner or later you'll end up having to pirate those anyway. Don't feel bad about it, if you make your first few hundred bucks, buy a license for one of your programs.

> Can anyone just point me to what I should watch/read in order to get going and how readonable my goals are?
The most efficient way is to watch how others work, so watch tutorial videos, but don't always follow along, try to apply the techniques they show to your own stuff. The first rigging tutorial I did I used my own character mesh that had different proportions to what was in the course.
The tutors that helped the most were Grant Warwick, Arrimus3D, Tim Bergholz, Dan Cox, Allegorithmic for Substance tutorials and Michael Pavlovich for ZBrush. I guess way back in the day 3DTotal.com was a pretty good first stop for beginners, but I heven't been there in ages, but maybe it's still good. 80lv is on the higher-end of resources, as you already need a good understanding to make sense of what they say, but keep tabs on them for when you're going into the gamedev curve. Gnomon workshop is also a pretty intermediate to advanced resource, but keep tabs on it. For Blender specifically, I only know about BlenderGuru and CG Cookie, but haven't watched their content yet. Finally check out PolyCount, they have some interesting techniques on display there in the wiki and the forum is slow but you can get some pretty technical answers if need be.
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>>593816
Save this list of YT channels:

>Arrimus3D
>ChamferZone
>Tor Frick
>Grant Warwick
>BlenderGuru
>Gleb Alexandrov
>CGCookie
>CGGeek
>quixel
>Unreal Engine
>Denis Keman
>Mograph Plus
>YanSculpts
>Michael Pavlovich
>Pixologic
>Allegorithmic
>AgenZasBrothers
>Mind Games Interactive
>VirtusLearningHub
>PyroDev
>Dean Ashford
>Fabrice Bourrelly
>Steve's tutorials
>Futurepoly
>Gnomon
>The 3D Tutor
>Mike Hermes
>Remington Graphics
>4DVisual
>CGMasterAcademy
>WorldffLevelDesign
>80lv
>TeslaDev
>Matthew Palaje
>Mathew Wadstein

If you're starting with Blender, subscribe to BlenderGuru, Gleb Alexandrov and CGGeek. For sculpting in Blender, you have YanSculpts and AgenZasBrothers specifically. As others have said, you can always pirate and try out different programs, and that is what I also recommend you to do. But for a first month or two, stick with one (in this case Blender), and get comfortable working with it. Learn basics of modeling, unwrapping and texturing and then you can easily jump to something else and see if the workflow fits you better.

Also, keep in mind the first 4 names on the list are top-tier educators, and Arrimus and Grant Warwick are especially good for introduction to 3D modeling. They use 3DS Max, but you can be fine going through the videos with Blender, although if you want to start with them, I'd recommend to just download 3DS Max instead, because it'll be easier to follow while you're new. Otherwise, stick with BlenderGuru and his donut other beginner tutorials, which are quite good.

For texturing in today's world, you'll definitely want to use programs like Substance Painter or Quixel, as well as Substance Designer for creating your own procedural textures. For sculpting, you have Zbrush, but Blender's sculpting tools are pretty good, and if you don't have a drawing tablet, that is IMO even a better choice, since Zbrush's interface is a bit hard to use with mouse only. That's why I started sculpting with Blender, even though I have Zbrush.
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>>593822
Also, I recently mentioned this in the questions thread, but if you see a really nice tutorial and the tutor uses Max or Maya but you're on Blender, just watch it anyway. Many people generally stick to the basics these programs offer, so as long as you know whatever equivalent yours has, it shouldn't be too difficult to get the point. There are plenty of scripts available online that extend the capabilities of various programs, so if you feel like you're missing something, chances are you aren't the only one, and there's a script for that.
Along the same vein, I also want to mention that for animation you want to study *traditional* animation and principles, alongside the technical details you need to do the same in 3D. The wealth of information pertaining to animation in the traditional medium is much broader, so make use of it.
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>>593824
Also, I didn't have enough space left in the previous post, so I'll say it now - CGCookie is a really good service for learning Blender, and it also has multiple character creation courses. It's subscription based, but you can also always pirate the courses if you can't pay.

The one website you HAVE to be registered on in that case is CGPeers:

https://www.cgpeers.com/index.php

I think registrations are open only on the 1st and 15th of a month or something like that, but they have everything you will ever need in your 3D pursuit, from tutorials to full programs and plugins. It's the ultimate source of knowledge.

Also, once when you get more into it, start following forums like Polycount and BlenderArtists as well as 80lv for articles about the 3D industry. They're always a great source of useful information.

Have fun.
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>>593816
You can go to the US maya page, register as a student, and get a free version of maya 2014-2018 I believe for 3 years. You just gotta give them an email and pretend you're a high school student or w/e
You get 2 downloads from it.
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>>593816
Your goals are pretty reasonable. Stuff like rigging/animation you can "learn" in less than a month, I had my first basic rig and animation done in a few days. It wasn't good, but the basic concepts are pretty quick to pick up and most of the work is just getting better at it, doing more complex stuff.

A 5-10min video in one year is doable, but you've gotta manage your expectations. Do you want it to have sound? Do you want it to be well edited, structured? That's a lot to learn.

5 years to learn to make game assets at an entry level for the industry is reasonable. Courses that turn inexperienced highschool graduates into employable artists only take 3 years, and even though not every "game art degree" graduate comes out the other end employable, plenty of people do. Self-taught you can go at your own pace, and your own pace is, honestly, probably going to be faster than the average university course material.
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>>593838
>5 years to learn to make game assets at an entry level for the industry is reasonable. Courses that turn inexperienced highschool graduates into employable artists only take 3 years
What the actual fuck. Show me some examples of entry level work then. I thought 1 year is more than enough.
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>>593841
...unlikely. I'm doing 3D stuff right now for about 6 months after a long hiatus, so even though I already knew how to use some programs on a basic level, I'm currently practicing building basic level geometry for a game.
I also have a character modeled and rigged (poorly), especially not an impressive feat since it's practically a blob with arms, legs and a head. It's not even unwrapped as UVs and texturing will be irrelevant, given it's a uniformly colored, fur-covered creature. Taking the easy way through this all the way for a first project.
Since I'm a 1MA, I'm also cramming Unreal Engine so that I have somewhere to use this content, so amongst all this I'm juggling game design too. I guess you can get really good a one thing in a year like modeling, it's not that complex in and of itself, the complexities start to pile on as you need to spread out your knowledge to make your stuff actually usable. A mesh with flawless topology isn't as impressive if it's not unwrapped and textured, and that's certainly a time sink in its own right... and then lighting and rendering... VFX possibly... and animation as you've mentioned. Try to limit yourself for a start in any case. Everything starts with modeling, regardless of whatever else you end up going into.
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>>593822
>>593826
>>593827
Listen to this guy, this is good advice.
>>593841
I think 1 year is enough if you're going to specialize. If you want to be a jack of all trades then I think 5 years sounds more reasonable.
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>>593841
1 year might get you there if you're already an artist prior to taking up 3D, and specializing in something really specific. Since we're talking game art, 3 years, for reliable employment in game art, is pretty average for those that actually do find employment, especially since many of them go through university or specialized schools. Some absolutely terrible artists can find employment but people can also win the lottery, it's not the norm.
Anyway, I was saying that, if anything, it'd take *less* than 5 years, on average, to get to the standard of being able to make assets for an indie game. Way less.

Since I'm not an employer I don't keep jr. level modeler portfolios lying around on my harddrive. Portfolios that get through for jr. positions tend to look something like this http://www.serriffe.com/indexPortfolio.html
If we're talking freelance, yes, you could freelance within a year of starting 3D art. You could sell commissions within a year of starting to draw seriously. Neither are the same thing as being employed by a studio.
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OP here, got a couple more hours before shift ends. First of all I want to say thanks to everyone for being so helpful.

As soon as I get home Ill sub to those channels and start having a look.

Just a couple follow up questions:

Im assuming I should follow the advice of the poster who said get used to the basics of modeling, unwrapping and texturing. I would guess that sculpting should come later once I actually get my bearings in the 3d world?

Im also very confused by a lot of the terminology, is that something I should fix now with some sort of glossary or should I just roll with it and pick it up as I go?

Since Im sticking to blender for the time being will there be any major software revisions or UI changes that will make the mechanical side of learning the software change in the near future? By mechanical I mean understanding how to do things in the software rather than conceptual (which from what I gather is where cross software tuts would help) dont know if im using the right terminology here, apologies.

In the case of pirating, im currently unable to as I live in a shared house and only have wifi available, as such Id rather not get anyone in trouble as landlord has had issues with isp letters in the past. However I can probably scrounge up some money if theres a very good tutorial series or the like. I figure if Itll save me some time and/or make learning more enjoyable/efficient itd be worth it. If that was the case could you recomend anything that comes to mind?

Video goal I imagine without sound. I guess the quality of the video as a video isnt too important, personally its about being able to tell a small story with even basic wonky models that dont quite move right or have clipping issues. In my head things like great lighting or complex...materials? Would come later. Im fine with being shit as long as I can see reasonable growth given reasonable time/effort.

Again thanks for everything. Leaving thread open for discussion if ok?
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>>593872
>Im assuming I should follow the advice of the poster who said get used to the basics of modeling, unwrapping and texturing. I would guess that sculpting should come later once I actually get my bearings in the 3d world?
Sculpting is mostly an extension of your core modeling skills, you’ll often have to make use of traditional models to make your sculpts usable anyway, or use sculpting as a supplement to add detail to base meshes.

>Im also very confused by a lot of the terminology, is that something I should fix now with some sort of glossary or should I just roll with it and pick it up as I go?
Just roll with it, the terms will stick easily as you’re going through tutorials. Different programs have their own names for certain operations, some of it’s the same, but honestly there’s not that much to learn in terms of terminology.

>Since Im sticking to blender for the time being will there be any major software revisions or UI changes that will make the mechanical side of learning the software change in the near future? By mechanical I mean understanding how to do things in the software rather than conceptual (which from what I gather is where cross software tuts would help) dont know if im using the right terminology here, apologies.
Largely irrelevant. I was away from Max for like 8 years and it’s still the same program it was then, just fancier and with more features. The world of 3D is deeply rooted in keeping things “the same” as long as it makes sense to, so that you don’t upset your user base and maintain backwards-compatibility. Bridging skills across programs isn’t that tough, across versions even less so.

>In the case of pirating, im currently unable to as I live in a shared house and only have wifi available, as such Id rather not get anyone in trouble as landlord has had issues with isp letters in the past.
ISP letters aren’t worth shit, you get one, you toss it in the trash, you pretend it never came in the mail.




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