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hey /3/, I've been studying 3d Graphic art for about 4 and a half years now, and I've come a long way. I started out in early 2013 making a simple tank out of a few blocks and spheres in wings 3d, on an Acer laptop, to building a fairly decent Ninja character, after going through a Udemy character creation course.


I've gone from peicing together youtube tutorials and blogs to now studying courses on Udemy that I bought with some money I raised, But I am still facing a problem, no matter how much I learn I still feel like my work has that "amateur" look to it, and I just can't seem to make that breakthrough to the pro level. So I am thinking, where do I go from here to get better at creating models? Should I continue studying on these online courses? Should I go to college? It's been a pretty big stumbling block for me, and I feel like I'm hitting a wall.
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>>587961


Maybe because you're just not trying to advance.

Do cool concepts, model, uv rig,and after every shit you make, make different things, each harder and better.
You made a lowpoly dick yesterday?, Today make a hard surface dildo.

Sculpted a sausage?, Now sculpt a fucking dragon senpai.


No course will make you a professional, you learned techniques, but you have to apply them.
Also, make things you like, but not that gay shit from the pic, make a cool ninja, not that faggot in pijama.
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>>587961
I would recommend you studying anatomy too. Also i used to rip models out of games i like and inspect them; proportions, topology, rigs etc., it takes more time but if you are like me you may enjoy it, tough now you can go to sites like sketchfab too.
While i can't quite see, upper body seems rather well according to other parts but those legs are really just noddle.
Also 4 years is a long time i guess you tried to improve yourself on the side?
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>>587965

yeah there are some good models out there I can rip, that would probably help a lot with proportions ect.

yeah. I did it a few hours a day whenever I felt like it for the first couple of years. now I dedicate the entire week to study and relax on weekands. I wouldn't have taken this long if I had actually gone to school for it, but I didn't. I'm not too bothered by how much time it's taken honestly, I went from barley being able to draw or write with no artistic experience to being able to make lots of things, so I guess I did alright for someone who didn't go to school for it.
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Do you have 2d art skills? You won't be able to create cool characters without art skills. If you don't have art skills, just make models from concept art.
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>>587972

Not really, I can make textures but thats about it.
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If you're 4 years in, and the quality of work you're producing looks like the pic in the OP. Then its time for you to give up or just do this as a hobby, because it isnt even close to amateur quality.

Im not saying this to be mean, but ive seen people produce better stuff after a month or two of learning 3d. You're either not being honest about how much you practise, or this just isnt for you.

But if you still want to try, then i recommend:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhiusjLUKVU

https://gumroad.com/grassetti
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>>587973
Yeah you need to learn 2D.
>>588009
Also dont listen to people like this, its not about raw talent or anything like that. Anybody can persevere it just takes dedication. You need to continue applying yourself and start becoming more aware of how you use your time. Maybe you are making things but if they arent challenging you or they arent teaching you new skills then just be aware of that.

Again practice will make you better but theres better forms of practice to consider. Find them and use them to your advantage.
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>>588014

did you even read what i said? i said he's probably isnt being honest about how much he's practised. He needs a reality check, stop bluepilling people.

I dont believe in raw talent either. But there are some people that pick things up faster than others due to the way their brain is wired.

You need to practise everday, learn the fundamentals anatomy etc. Because the same things apply to digital sculpting/3d. And alot of people dont seem to grasp this fact.
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Not OP, but how do you even decide what you're going to model when you're just doing it for practice?
When I haven't got a project (game or something) to be working towards I can never figure out what to make.
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>>588029
At least that is easy. Pick some model, scene or concept art you like and try to recreate it, or model something that you think might be of use in your next game. You don't even have to think about innovation here, just choose some good reference and just make sure that it is challenging enough so you actually improve and learn something new from it. You already have the end result so you know exactly how your project needs to look like when finished.
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>>588018
You dont tell someone to give up you tell them to work harder, thats redpill. Telling someone they should just give up is beta shit.
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>>587961
If the OP is your work after 4 years than my advice is either go to a school and have a professional teach you, because you clearly are incapable of learning this stuff on your own or just give up on it althogheter. 4-5 years is usually the timeframe required to get a strong portfolio, one that gets you jobs at top companies and you don't even qualify for amateur level with that thing. i know it soounds harsh, but chances are you aren't going to make it
Pic related, is where you should be in terms of skill
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>>588229
The secret all these hot, zero-to-hero-in-3-years 3D artists are keeping is:
They didn't start art when they got their first PC and 3D package, they started it the moment they could hold a pencil.
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>>587961
If you want to advance to the next level then stop using blender.
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>>588254
I can tell you from personal experience that is bullshit, if your learning is well structured and you have access to the right material you can get to "hero" in even less time than 3 years. In fact, my experience tells me you probably can get to be one of the top dogs in 5-6 years time if a thorough plan is followed and you don't waste time practicing like and idiot. But keep telling yourself what you just said there, it's a great way to justify to yourself slow progress and bad art
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>>588254
I don't think that's true, especially not if you want to do something other than characters. I think you can become a great 3D artist without a lot of drawing/painting knowledge.
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>>588307
Can you explain "don't waste time practicing" part? Why would practice be a waste of time?
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>>588309
nobody who's good actually practices. Not joking.
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>>588307
>it's a great way to justify to yourself slow progress and bad art

It's not, though? Everything I learned through 2D art was instantly applicable to a lot of 3D.
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>>588311
>idea guy modeller / texture artist
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>>588310
Wtf.
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>>588311
Such as?
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>>588310
Hyuck.

Now I know you're just fucking with us.
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>>588315
Already knowing human and animal anatomy, general design sense (as in: being able to stylize without making it look weird), color theory, making your own reference/concept.
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>>588309
My motto is ' You practice to get faster, not to get better. You STUDY to get better.

What i mean: Let's say you want to be able to sculpt a realistic head. Sculpting heads over and over most likely won't help you improve)or you will improve extremely slow) because your knowledge that is required to sculpt better remains the same since when you started (anatomy) but you will most likely succeed in creating a shitty head, faster. What you need to do to improve is put the wacom down and study, as in open an anatomy book and study like in school, look at details in other peoples work, study faces in motion, etc.
The same goes for other fields, like texturing, box modeling, composition, etc
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>>588419
You cannot get good without trying, failing, iterating and practicing, period.

Your motto is dumb and you should feel dumb about it.
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>>588421
Well, for me it works wonders. I rarely practice if ever. But yeah, I agree that maybe this approach is not for everyone
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>>588419
Well, since I made the example with the head sculpting I will post an example of my progress regarding head sculpting. The first one from 2016 is the first time ever I tried to sculpt anything in zbrush. The latter is my most recent and finished in a few hours.
And yeah, I made the same type of progress in the rest of the pipeline(texturing, shading, hard surface modeling) by following this exact same type of approach of minimum practicing. I have absolutely no background in art or drawing(i can't draw for shit). So yeah, I believe telling people that progress requires you to have years of drawing experience is just bullshit
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>>587961
I recognize that tutorial (haven't done it myself though). Even the perfectly made finished product on that tutorial looks really bad, but here you made the mistake of 1) having no materials 2) no lighting 3) no pose 4) no scene composition (setting up the camera, background elements, etc to tell a little bit of a story)

Show us a render (with all the shit I mentioned) instead of a screenshot of the viewport
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>>588421
>You cannot get good without trying, failing, iterating and practicing, period.
There's practicing a new thing a couple times to commit it to memory, and then there's "daily sculpt / sketch" shit.
Sketching is fine for building up muscles but once you've got those, you're not going to gain anything new.
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>>588419
check out the book "Art and Fear" and the story about the potter

https://excellentjourney.net/2015/03/04/art-fear-the-ceramics-class-and-quantity-before-quality/
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>>588425
thats some nice progress
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>>588014
>Also dont listen to people like this, its not about raw talent or anything like that
do you even understand what raw talent is ?
inteligence and creativity go hand in hand, there is a reason why that nigglet in africa drinking cow piss has not created a monalisa.
im not saying op is a nigglet in africa, but its ok to realise your not made to do specific things.
i cant be a surgeon since i messed up my wrists, i cant persevere trough the shakyness and ctrl+z shit.
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just leaving this here
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>>588436
It's a nice story but it just doesn't align with my personal experience and with what I see around me. But hey, if that works for you, go for it. Just don't make up excuses when it takes you a decade to achieve what others do in 3-4 years
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>>588425
Practicing is not just a way for you to re-iterate on what you already know, it's a way for you to christen new things you've learned or apply what you already knew, but in a different context. Even you must know this, as I doubt you've made one sculpt in a whole year-long gap while you studied and it just happened to come out good.

Some people don't like books and theory, and they're perfectly okay with spitting out drawings and models inspired by things they like, as a catalyst for learning new things. To those people, practice is most certainly not a waste of time, and any step that teaches them another technique in the pipeline, and encourages them to keep going and not quit, is a step well-measured and time well-spent.

They may never reach your level of african american bust collector, but different circumstances apply and maybe they just don't have that kinda kink.
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>>588466
I already mention that I don't think my approach would necessarily work for everybody, maybe some would need a more balanced position between studying and practice. That being said I still believe that trying to progress mainly through practice, as opposed to studying and using practice mostly to cement knowledge, is a much, much slower (if not downright inferior) way to make progress.

I just believe that is this flower power approach to art (it's art, do it how you feel like it, there is no right way to learn it and apply it, everyone is an artist, just practice and you\ll get there bla bla bla) is holding a lot of people down because it lacks scope and structure. Advancing your art skills is not this magical process where everyone tries hard yet only the worthy succeed. I believe, that just like in any other field, knowledge and studying should be put as the foundation, and only when that foundation is solid enough you should switch gears towards hardcore practicing. A doctor, for example, studies for years before ever touching a patient.
I just believe that this advice that is repeated like a mantra to beginners("just practice n hours a day and you will eventually get there") is akin to saying some one "hey, there is a door somewhere, just bang your head against every wall you can find and eventually you will find it".
But yeah, that's just my opinion
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>>588436
If the quantity is shit then the quantity isn't going to do you any good.
If the quantity is good, ie. you're focused on learning specific things while you practice, then you'll see results. Mindlessly shitting out a billion things isn't going to do you much good, and modeling/drawing isn't as straightforward as pottery.
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>>588447
Sometimes I wonder if I really do have a good taste, though. How is he so sure that you get into a creative field because you have a "good taste"? What about all those people on /r/delusionalartists for example? Do they also have good taste but just need to... Improve?
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>>588466
This reminds me of all those chess enthusiasts who spend decades playing chess in the park yet never get even close to the level of a master because they have no theoretical basis and no structure to their games. Then they get pissy when they get crushed by 10 year old kids with formal chess education. But boy, they sure do practice a lot though
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>>588479
If they think they're the shit when they're really just shit then they don't have good taste.
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>>588482
Elaborating: He's also saying that if you can recognize when you're making shit, or even if you're making alright stuff but realize you could be doing better, then you've got good taste, because shit doesn't satisfy you. That's what'll drive you to make your work better.
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>>588482
Hence why I said that part of the quote doesn't make much sense.
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>>588483
True, yeah.
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>>588480
Yes, because playing chess and being a doctor is entirely comparable to practicing art in an art field.
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>>588510
Neah, Art is this completely alien thing that has absolutely nothing in common with any other human profession or the way any of those professions are learned and practiced.
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>>588513
Art isn't a zero-sum game based on logic where you either win or lose, or your work is mission-critical to someone's life. It's an outlet for creativity.

Nobody is going to die if you doodle a shitty stick figure, and you won't lose anything by doing it either. I'm not saying spend your life doing the same shit over and over again slowly deluding yourself into thinking that you're hot shit, but by all means, practice more and study less if that's what you're into. You only stand to gain from doing that either way.
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>>588516
Anyway, that chess example was still pretty good.
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>>588516
>>588513

It actually depends on what kind of art you're doing. If you percieve art as a random outlet where you just for example draw something you find "nice" then probably you don't really know what art is in the first place. Since centuries great artists were using art to pass actual information about their visions, or about how things work in real world. Those were early simulators of experiencing shit you have low chance of experiencing on normal, everyday basis.

Greatly composed propaganda posters are art, but people ARE going to die if those posters will effectively empower wrong people. Just because you don't clearly see effects of art in society, or cannot measure it like two abstract numbers, it doesn't mean it's different from professions that are learned and practiced. You HAVE to practice in order to draw better, more realistically, to be able to compose your shit the way it actually gets to someone deep and passes your ideas without any offsets.




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