[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k] [s4s] [vip] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Home]
Board
Settings Home
/3/ - 3DCG


Name
Options
Comment
Verification
4chan Pass users can bypass this verification. [Learn More] [Login]
File
  • Please read the Rules and FAQ before posting.
  • There are 6 posters in this thread.

05/04/17New trial board added: /bant/ - International/Random
10/04/16New board for 4chan Pass users: /vip/ - Very Important Posts
06/20/16New 4chan Banner Contest with a chance to win a 4chan Pass! See the contest page for details.
[Hide] [Show All]



File: zbrush.jpg (223 KB, 792x521)
223 KB
223 KB JPG
Correct me if I'm wrong, but a lot of sculpting in software like zbrush and 3dcoat seems to come down to basically this, awkwardly pulling and pushing things into place until it looks right. I've been learning 3dcoat the last couple of days and I found it easy to get into. I get that it's more flexible and intuitive to sculpt the finer details with a stylus in a sculpting package, but wouldn't it actually be easier to just create the basemesh with regular subdivision modeling? It seems you'd have way more control in getting the main thrust of the forms.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwo5za_Ywf8
>>
>>586236
Since Dynamesh was added there is no compelling reason to say that box modeling is better than sculpting from a sphere for everyone. There are pros and cons to both ways so do what works for you.
>>
>>586238

Okay, I'm a 2d artist who dabbles in 3d so my opinion isn't super informed. I just feel like if you would, say for instance, want to define the curvature of the neck/spine/tail it would be done with more precision with a traditional modeling approach. I guess I'll just have to try it for myself.
>>
>>586236
>awkwardly pulling and pushing things into place until it looks right
Honestly that sounds like 3D modeling in general to me.

>I just feel like if you would, say for instance, want to define the curvature of the neck/spine/tail it would be done with more precision with a traditional modeling approach.
Precision is overrated for organics, besides, what's wrong with first roughing out the shape and then shifting it into place? ZBrush makes it easy enough for you to do this despite the high resolution geometry.
With standard poly modeling you do get to be very precise, but in order for the actual modeling to be manageable, you have to manipulate as low-resolution a mesh as you can get away with and have a subdivision on top so you can preview curvature, but it's not nearly as intuitive as sculpting, where you can make these adjustments regardless of detail level and have a better picture of your end-result.
Even when you're certain you know what you want the end result to be, things don't always turn out as such, and you'll invariably have to fall back on intuition and just playing around with stuff until it looks good, as to what tool helps you do that the fastest and with the highest quality results, you can determine for yourself.
>>
There are better tools and workflows for zBrush alone to create a basemesh than awkwardly pulling and pushing things into place (Look into zSpheres for starters). No offense but you are too new to make such assumptions. As others said, in the end, you should do what works for you, but do research in diverse workflows first.

Happy sculpting.
>>
>>586236

Look into using Zspheres in ZBrush, I find them to be a handy toold for making base meshes for more organic models
>>
I just crudely subdiv model parts of the reference in another modeling application and then dynamesh it in zbrush. Now you have the proportions correct and pretty precise and are ready to go.




Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.