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/gd/ told me to come here.
long story short: I'll be working with CNC machines. need to learn how to use autocad, unigraphix and similar software.
please advice, help, tutorials or whatever.
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Auto-what? You mean Blender. Blender is the best. Do you know how many mechanical parts and buildings have been designed in Blender? None.
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99% of people here work with polygons. go to some cad forum
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What do you want to know?

Go to Youtube. Google the software. I suggest taking a look at OnShape for 3D CAD.
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>>572665
>>572687

These. Video tutorials are your best option.
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>>572663
I suggest fusion 360, it's very easy to learn, has a simple interface, and has good tutorials out for it. But the workflow is really sluggish.

I would suggest McNeal rhino second, it's mostly easy to learn, but it lends itself to a very "hacky" workflow but you can create a bit faster. Expect a lot of weird things to happen.

If you really want total simplicity and ease of use I would suggest MOI3d.
It's barebones cad only, and although it's not as powerful and featured as others it's definitely the easiest to learn out of all these. It's also super fast and cheap$$$.

Autocad is autocad. Never used it personally. Same for NX.
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>>572663
>>572663
There is also Solidworks, which many companies use. I've only used it a little bit, but it and fusion are similar, with Solidworks having much more features and options for engineering.
Basically if you are working with engineers, they probably use solidworks.
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>>572700
this

solidworks is the standard but a lot of companies are picking up fusion just because iteration and design is simpler and you can learn it in 2 days
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>>572663
Not sure which part of the manufacturing process you are working with but if you are working directly with the machines you may need to look into CAM software. Some CAD programs have tools built into them for machine control (Solidworks for example has a tool to automatically write to g-code) but if all you are doing is receiving models/drawings to be machined then you may only need to learn how to work with machine code.
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>>573118
>Not sure which part of the manufacturing process you are working with

lathes and mills. take raw metal, turn it into a piece.
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>>572663
To mill or turn metal, you need to study, don't listen to those retards, you need technical education. To work with metal you need to know how to read a blueprint, how to draw one, standarts(either ISO, DIN, or whatever your country has), you need to know projections, symbols, etc. Then you need to understand metals, there are hundres of kinds of alloys, yes most metal manufacturing uses alloys and rarely metals. Then you need to understand what kind of metalworking machines you're gonna work with, is it cutting, bending, milling, turning, welding, grinding, etc. Every type is different.
Nowadays a company for metal milling and turning with serial production(cnc machines) usually uses three types of machines: vertical milling, turning and multiaxis(1 or 2 or more swappable palletes that handle up to 5/6 faces). Those machines require a high degree of understanding the process and materials/tools you are using, especially when cutting steel or harder materials. There's also bending on brake presses, presses, rollers, etc. There's also 2d and 3d cutting. Lasers, water jets, plasma cutters, etc.
The CAD is the computer drawing of an object, be it 3d or 2d you need depending on what job you are going to do be able to draw in your company's software of choice. Skills are usually transferable between software packages.
The CAM is software that based on path you define in the software generates gcode(usually) that instructs the machines how to work. Some machines have an additional type of code that cna control them, for example Yamazaki Mazak's Mazatrol programming language.
Anyway, give me a more detailed information on what your job will exactly be, cause for a small to middle sized production factory there are usually 5 different job profiles going into making one part.
An engineer, constructor, programmer, setup operator, operator. What are you gonna be?
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>>573127
An engineer is the brain of a project, he turns an idea into an object, tests vulnerabilities, the inner workings, types of material for usage, you tell him build me a car and he does it. A usual requirement is a higher education, at least a bachelor's degree in machine construction or similar.
A constructor is a person that takes the engineer's sketches, or raw models, etc and turns them into proper documentation, blueprints, 3d models, finds proper usable materials, modifies something to be easier to manufacture of faster, etc. Again usually a higher degree of education is needed.
A programmer is a person that takes the final blueprints from the constructor and turns them into gcode for the specified machine, manufacturing is his job, usually but not always requires higher education, due to knowledge about tools and how different materials are worked, also in serial production a part is done from more than one side, and in jigs, so he needs to prepare those too, a part is usually done in a few steps, not one.
A setup operator is a person who prepares a part for serial production, usually takes programs from the programmer and sets up the machines so the part can be produced with ease, some times those people also program instead of programmers. It requires technical education, but not a higher degree usually. From my experience those people feel the job, rather than study it. They work at point zero in manufacturing and learn through experience.
An operator is a person who loads part in the set machine, works them and then finalizes the part(chamfers, etc). Requires technical education.
In my experience there are companies that either have setup operators and operators as different groups or one type of a mix of the two, people who both setup and work their machines(produce parts).
In smaller companies you can find a mix of 4 jobs, I've personally been a mix of constructor, programmer and the last two on a fiber laser in a small company.
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>>573128
You need a friend.
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>>573131
A friend is a person who tells you when it's time to stop posting, brings you hot pockets and plays video games with you. Requires gullibility and patience.
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>>572663
Autocad is Cancer. Go steal Solidworks like an adult.
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>>573127
>>573128
Thnaks for your replies. I'll probably be a programmer, as I'll have to deal with the lathe and the mill, but also program machines work and other things, so it may be the definition that suits better whta I'll be stuying




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