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would it be possible to follow tutorials without relent and get to this level of skill by summer as a novice who messed with zbrush/maya but hasn't dived balls deep?
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You can get good at sculpting without needing any tutorial, all you need is some anatomy knowledge and patience. Now rigging it and making the mesh not a clusterfuck is another story.
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>>545737
how long would fixing topology and rigging it take? i've handled IK rigs in terms of posing and shit, but never made bone placement or skinning, let alone animation although i did do the steps of making two cameras at an angle and making keys, just wasn't satisfied with how i posed the keys.
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I can stay optimistic about making it in the 3d industry, when so many newcomers show up unable to answer the question only they can answer, "Can i make it?"
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If you already know anatomy and have a good design sense, yeah, shit is doable within 6 months.

If not, then no. Shit 3D noobs make doesn't look bad just because they don't know how to use their programs. Learning anatomy and design and being *good* at them takes time (a couple years at least), though you can get decent at fundamentals if you practice them hardcore for 6 months.
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>>545737
>you can do pic related without tutorials
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>>545757
I mean, it's not technically wrong, just retarded advice.
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>>545737
I would argue that it's pretty rough up front for a novice on how to properly lay down mass and achieve the shapes you want. Watching tutorials would be good for picking up a workflow you can understand.
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>>545735
Yes.
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>>545735
No.
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>>545735
Maybe.
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>>545735
kinda stupid question, op. is it possible? yes, of course it's possible if you have prerequisite skills like other people have mentioned and also a lot of innate talent and you apply yourself heavily for the next six months.

is it likely? no, because statistically speaking you're likely a scrub and a hack and you'll never amount to anything in your life.

there are definitely people in this world (and maybe on this board) who could accomplish what you're asking in six month. most people could not accomplish it in a lifetime. only way to know if you're one of the chosen ones is to start working at it. either way, 3D work is a lot of fun and you'll probably enjoy trying.

hope that helps and good luck.
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>>545735

Ugly looking blob monster that couldn't even grab the sword of it's back. You could do it by next week.
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>>545735
IMHO half years is too small amount of time, just to gasp everything, if you'll have teacher who'll tell you paths to go, then I think yes you'll get somewhere.

I started year ago, literally a year ago and maybe a week, but I work also, so I don't have all the time to learn 3d but after a year I'm kinda on good place,
but, I had years of experience, work as graphic designer/video engineer/after effects etc.. etc..
and I had some fine arts skills too (10 years fine arts school) so I know anatomy etc..


IMHO when you learn by yourself, you bump in many many problems which you think you are resolving and you are going completely wrong way, so many trial and error takes it's own time also.
but after a year I'm on a pretty good place
I learned zbrush, maya, texturing, little bit of rigging, done some walk cycles etc.
but I'm kinda making stopped on zbrush and started making characters with it, now I'm making my own character, without basemeshes, etc..
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>>545735

No chance OP. Unless you are a really good 2D artist, then no chance.

I tried to reach that level in a year, and I'm nowhere near that good.

There are also some artist who have been doing 3D for years and cannot reach that level.

Even if you did 19 hours a day everyday until summer you would still not be able to get that good.
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>>545802
/thread
People on this board don't really understand how important drawing and 2d design is to modeling/sculpting
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>>545802
This, with no prerequisites you will not get to this level by summer. I would be more optimistic on seeing you get near this level in 1.5-2 years. This is only doable however if you have the intelligence to do so, along with the discipline to practice and exceed - most don't.

>>545735
I have however seen people becoming very proficient in six months to have the ability to create cartoon characters on or near Pixar level. This isn't mastery of sculpting but it could definitely get you into the field if you went into stylized models, which is entirely plausible on the time length you are looking for.
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>>545797
I second this.

One year is more realistic.
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>>545735

not fucking close

and even if you did manage to make that buy summer, it'd take you until winter to make another.
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>>545737
>Now rigging it and making the mesh not a clusterfuck is another story.
No shit, Sherlock. Pic related is eye Candy for Zbrush only, the type of shit you see in artists portfolios all the time. Try exporting that shit to 3dsmax WITHOUT polygon reduction and without fucking up the details in the process. You show me pic related painted, textured and dancing and i´ll take my hat off to you.
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>>545830
>one year

lol one year is only for workflow purposes and getting everything right without fucking things up. second year for art making
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>>545774
>>545777
>>545786
I don't know
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Yes. Its possible if you have the will to work every day.

Sculpt anatomy every day. Every fucking day. Drawing helps speed it up.

USE REFERENCE. Seek critique for everything and do not disregard it even if the critique is shit.
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>>545735
Not a chance. Not even close.

A lot of people here have this idea that learning 3d equals learning the software. That's just the tip and the easiest part.

Don't be fooled. The road to the level you showed is depressingly long. It doesn't seem that way but it is.

Honestly I don't even know where to begin to explain to you dear anon the ridiculous amount of shit you have to know to do this. Pure knowledge stuff (design principles, anatomy, software), manual skills (sculpting, drawing) and simply experience.

You absolutely cannot brute force this in half a year or even 2 or 5 or whatever. This eventually takes full life dedication, nothing less.
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>>545945
You wont be able to create innovative work until you've mastered each individual aspect. But that will take a long time. Getting good enough to get hired doesnt require innovation, merely copying others.
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I have a similar question to OP.

Is it possible to get to this level in a year?

Assuming you know how to use modo and how to bake high poly to low poly.

On unrelated I'm going to try Seinfield don't break the chain method and do 3D 9 hours a day everyday. The problem is work full time so probably going to get fired, but hopefully it will work and I can atleast get a job as a prop artist in a year.
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>>545957
that scene looks fairly easy to replicate
its just a bunch of arrays and small details
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>>545958
replication is easy, creating an original work is not
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>>545957
Where the hell will you get the energy from?

I work full-time too and when I get home I yawn like crazy, just wanting to fall asleep at my desk. it's very hard to be productive.

Damn near impossible for me but I understand others have higher energy levels. I'm absolutely knackered, personally I have to dedicate time to my family as well, I hate spending so many hours away from them especially when I'm away at work all day.
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>>545957
It depends where you start from. "Knowing how to use" a 3d program isn't necessarily much.

Pic related is my result after a little over a month of learning vray + architectural visualization from scratch. I did a couple shitty models for games before, but never rendered or lit anything, and did minimal texture work.

Now if I can break down what makes this picture good, I would say it's 20% modeling, 40% lighting and materials, and 40% design.

Nothing in the modeling is terribly complicated. The train has a couple details that could be time-consuming, you can easily find simple guides on how to model everything else in this (and should know how anyway).

The lighting and material are a lot more complex. This is actually a scene done in UE4, which means you can get a similar result without having to fiddle with a renderer, for the best or the worst (it means you have to fiddle with UE4 instead). Learning PBR texturing is a more complex endeavour. You'll have to understand how different maps work, and how to translate real world materials and textures into these maps effectively. There is some documentation on this, although it's sadly not all in one place. I don't know unreal lighting, but simply getting the lighting to work shouldn't be too difficult if you find a couple good guides about it.

The last part is design, and that's the hardest part to "get good at" within one year, simply because there's so many little things that make design good and it takes a while to learn them all (plus again, they are things that you learn "all over the place"). If you suck at design, this will be your biggest hurdle, not learning tools like texturing or UE4.
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>>545957
>>545961

A few important design concepts that matter a lot when making pics like yours:

-Lighting (where/how to light and why)
-Textures (wear, contrast, properties, knowing which to use when and not simply how to make them)
-Design language (having your shapes, materials, etc. create something coherent)
-Spatial composition (creating balanced environments, framing your shot)
-Color composition (using materials and light temperatures to create mood)
-Good old "common sense" design and research (researching a japanese train station to see how these are made, researching abandoned buildings to see what kind of wear would build up)
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>>545957
I've been working part-time from my parents home since October '15, and I've put in on average 6-7 hours of 3d a day. Probably 10 days out of the last 450 where I have done less than an hour. Sometimes up to 17 hours, I've been kind of obsessed. I can say after a year I'm able to do everything within that scene/video.. though it'd take me about a month to do it, which is fair enough I guess. So yeah, without a doubt you can do it. I think if you don't have the full passion and complete enjoyment from it though, you may struggle.
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>>545735
no
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>>545735
yes.
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>>545961
>Now if I can break down what makes this picture good
this is your work tho kek
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>>545983
read one line after that
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>>545994
didn't pay attention.
anyway's. the image that he was trying to achieve is more about compositing than modeling. id say its a composition work rather than a modeling one
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>>545983
Yeah, I didn't mean to imply my work was "good".
I'm happy with the progress I made in a month but there's still a lot of stuff to do (along with a couple things with this specific pic I need to fix/rerender). I have a good idea of the road I need to travel, though.
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>>546005
I remember 5 years ago when I used to do raytraced kitchen / bedroom archviz scenes. KEK
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>>545961

why are people saying this isn't good? i'd think it was a photo if it was posted on another board.
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>>546025
its babby tier, anyone in the industry knows that raytracing kitchens is babbys first step
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>>546027

it still looks good though, at least to me
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>>546027
>anyone in the industry knows
>is himself an amateur retard shitposting on one of the worst 3d boards of the internet
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>>545735
You could try a few tutorials, here and get good.
>3darttutorials.tumblr.com

inb4
>tumblr
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>>545735
Why not learn another hobby without relent or google translate.
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>>545818
The entire reason I started drawing and doing 3D was to make that cute stylized pixar stuff.

Realism doesn't appeal to me at all and I find that it's detrimental since that's what seems to get jobs.
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>>546108
post your work
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>>546108
>since that's what seems to get jobs

That's not true though, is it? If you wanna work for AAA a lot of games are based on realism, but stylized 3d is all around us. Kids' games, indie games, cartoons. And it's not even limited to videogames, there's ad firms that rely on stylized visuals, design firms, any kind of graphic work.

I personally believe you need a good understanding of realism to pull off a stylized look, though. You don't need super detailed dirt maps and scratches and uber-gritty stuff (so if that's what you dislike that's fine), but you gotta understand stuff such as anatomical proportions, material properties, etc. before you can really delve into good stylization.
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>>546108
If stylized art is what got you into 3D and it's what you want too create, then you should really just skip over trying to perfect realism. However, with whatever art style you choose anatomy is a must; body details and traits are needed to perfect, alongside muscles and deformations. Stylization goes a long way with an understand of anatomy, so even though you could probably get away with knowing the basics+, you'd go a lot further knowing the body and its facial structures. As >>546113
said materials are also needed to know, but in my honest opinion material types do not take years of practice - moreso on how you utilize them.

Learn anatomy regardless.
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>>546110
only been at this about 18 months, it's nothing worth showing
>>546113
>>546151
For sure, I know of the importance of anatomy. I go to figure drawing classes and such.

There's one studio where I live that makes kids cartoons and uses stylized work, and they tend to hire people that are around an intermediate level (very rare for character artists I think). Other than that It just doesn't seem that common to me.




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