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today i entered a website of people in my country that are looking for job in many areas. 2D,3D,animation,video editing,programming,web design,writing,acting etc.
the number of people looking for a job or a gig is just unreal.

i feel like learning 3D or anything that involves some sort of art in it is just futile, expect for very specific niche stuff that requires good technical level of skill to begin with (character artists,unity programmers etc).

should i just keep it as a hobby and not attempt to go into such industry or just study something more practical and handy rather than compete in such a stacked industry.
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>>539491
>today i entered a website of people in my country that are looking for job in many areas. 2D,3D,animation,video editing,programming,web design,writing,acting etc.
>the number of people looking for a job or a gig is just unreal.

Most of those people are prob freelance, so you should expect a large volume of individuals. Also depends where you live.

>i feel like learning 3D or anything that involves some sort of art in it is just futile, expect for very specific niche stuff that requires good technical level of skill to begin with (character artists,unity programmers etc).

It always related to your skill / portfolio. 3D generalists are nothing to scoff at either, and are often times much more useful to a production comp then someone who's deep into a subject, simply because they can move around on projects.

>should i just keep it as a hobby and not attempt to go into such industry or just study something more practical and handy rather than compete in such a stacked industry.

Are you motivated enough to learn on your own? Do you enjoy it enough to sit down 3 hours, a day to watch tutorials? Do you already know someone in the industry? Do you come from a family that can support you for the next 2-5 years of you life as you study and try to get a position and make contacts, and work on projects for slave wages?
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>Are you motivated enough to learn on your own? Do you enjoy it enough to sit down 3 hours, a day to watch tutorials?
yes
>Do you already know someone in the industry?
not very personally, i speak with them occasionally about technical stuff and not about work.
>Do you come from a family that can support you for the next 2-5 years of you life
yes.

i already have a portfolio that is 1 year in the making, i receive criticism by other artists on a regular basis.
its just that i am socially autistic and i won't post anything i made here.
and the people that post 3D work on that website are not of a concern to me, what concern's me is the number of people looking for work
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>>539491
Absolutely. There is always a high demand for art. What is your specialty
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>>539511
props/environment

i also have decent knowledge on rendering
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This is only from my own personal research, but here's my understanding of the industry. I am not a professional, so this may or may not be accurate.

From my understanding, the industry is absolutely horrible for any type of "technical art" skill.
This includes anything such as 2D animation, storyboarding, video editing, 3D animation, modeling, rigging, etc.

The reasons I've found for this is that most of your work is via contracting, so you don't have to legally be given benefits, not to mention the long hours of mandatory overtime to meet deadlines.
You have to really love what you do, and not mind putting in the extra hours.
Apparently work is also extremely volatile, since you're initially going to have to work as a contractor. You may go 2-3 months without having a job, after working at a studio for 8 months prior.

It's all rather depressing, really.

Again, this is all just from google, and various professionals I've asked. This may or may not be correct.
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>>539521
professional here

technical artists have it better in general (fx, riggers, etc) because there's less oversaturation

contract work is regular yeah but there are also staff positions depending on the place.

the work conditions also depend on the studio. where I am now, I haven't done any overtime in the last two months at all
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>>539522
I'm in a CG school and we're also constantly told (by teachers and pros alike) that there's a higher demand for riggers and fx artists, cause no one wants to do it.
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>>539536
yeah but don't just do it cause of the demand, you will still be better off doing what you like since you'll have more motivation
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>>539585
I wasn't planning on doing it lol, hate that shit too.
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there are gonna be a lot of artists in any category

most of them are trash and the ones that aren't trashed get hired

it's that simple pretty much



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