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File: model.png (156 KB, 680x552)
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I'm thinking about going to an art school. They'll teach me how to make stuff like this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvAxfjkznA0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGomrMgHDIo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7m73jxJYWM
Do you think that making an portfolio with models, sculptures and animations on this level would be enough to get a job or at least an internship?

I want to become a 3d artist, but I'm worried that the industry is so oversaturated that my goals simply aren't realistic.
I need a red pill, /3/.
>>
art school is good for only a few things:
1. foundation art studies
2. networking
3. getting advice and education from veterans of whatever industry you've studied (not a guarantee at all schools)

a better use of your money would be to look for colleges in your area (including community colleges) with good foundations classes. classes on the basics of 2d and 3d design, color theory, drawing, painting, life drawing and anatomy. if you take them seriously, you'll learn a lot that will directly applicable to 3d cg art. a major that's more rounded in digital media rather than a specific niche like art for games or visual effects will give you more wiggle room to develop yourself as an artist and find out what you really want to do. foundations are the most important, though

the problem with education tracks and majors focusing only on one thing like art for games or visual effects is that it's really easy to find yourself halfway through the program and realizing you don't even like the subject anymore or aren't really capable of doing it at a professional level. but what are you going to do? if you went into an expensive niche program, you've burned your way through $100k and realizing your options are to either finish the program and not have a clue what to do after, switch majors and eat another huge chunk of tuition fees, or drop out.

regardless, i would never go to a program that doesn't spend the first year or so having you learn the foundations. community colleges can be a great place to start for that. there are many different paths you can take in your education. you have to remember that it's a path that may take you somewhere you didn't anticipate. as far as oversaturation of 3d industries, that is a valid concern. you can't assume you're going to go to an expensive school and walk out getting a job. in the end it's entirely about putting in a ton of hard work and study to develop the skills you want
>>
>>526501

No none of those are production worthy models and yet this is the stuff that 3d schools pump out constantly.

I don't know what sector you want to join so I will talk about games. There are about 200 character artist positions in the industry and it's ever decreasing as tools become better.

Go an artstation.com and search for people like Frank Tzeng then go to his likes page to see who else is good. You must emulate or be even better than these people to get a job in the industry.

For fps weapons look up Greg Rassam again same principle. Look for prominent environment artists and do the same thing.

The only other method in to the industry is outsourcing. You don't need to be as good as above but deadlines are tight and you are competing with a worldwide talent pool. In ten years or so China and India will completely take over this entry point. Look at the credits in any AAA game and you will see all the Chinese outsourcing company's.

Don't waste ur money on schools buy a good computer and a 1440p monitor and follow a goal of being able to crank out a project each week in your chosen field. Don't get sentimental, learn from something and move on immediately if it's not working out. Keep screenshots of your progress from the beginning of the year to the next. After a year you will know if you want to pursue it as a career once you see the workload involved.
>>
You should save your time / money and work a real job and do 3d as a hobby until you get gud enuff (if you get gud enuff) to get gigs
>>
For those that are interested: I've contacted some of the authors of those models and animations. Most of those people don't even work in the industry (they either abandoned 3d art or are designing websites). The rest of them are making arch viz or have jobs as art teachers.

>>526514
>a major that's more rounded in digital media rather than a specific niche like art for games or visual effects will give you more wiggle room to develop yourself as an artist and find out what you really want to do.
>it's really easy to find yourself halfway through the program and realizing you don't even like the subject
Thanks for pointing it out, those are really good points. I'll find myself a good college.

>>526515
Thanks for the pill, I appreciate it.
>>
>>526515
so you are basically saying that every first world 3d artist will be out of work in the next 10 years?
>>
>>526515
Not op but thanks for this, needed it. Better get to work...
>>
>>526943

The problem with China an Japan is that they are behind on workflow and tend to be for a good amount of time.

Most people in China and Japan come from a 2D background, which is helpful but not really.

A good example, of this is Substance Painter and Designer. I don't know any studio who uses Substance Designer in China and it would be a waste of time to outsource that work to them. If it was hand painting textures you would outsource it.

As new tools and workflows are being developed there is less need to outsource stuff. Like it is pointless to outsource to China when you can use Substance Designer.

The problem with China is most artist struggle with English and so it takes time for tutorials or training to be available to use new workflows.

Look at China and Japan they have garbage CG.

So the idea that all jobs would be outsourced to China is really stupid.
>>
>>526501

If you really want to get a job, then do props and environments.

Tor Frick has really nice Gumroad videos, he is probably the best and fastest prop/environment artist. Look at his work.

Get substance designer, most environment artist use that now. Look at tutorials for Jacob Norris, he is probably one of the best in terms of texturing game environments.

Then, maybe just slowly build up environments or do props until you can do environments.

When I was garbage I had it to do an environment every two months, I also had it so I'm working at least 8 hours a day.

If you become really good and finding you are not getting notice, a good tip is to find a popular game and just remake the level in Unreal engine. That is how I got a job I remade a part of a level and posted it on polycount.
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>>526514
> i would never go to a program that doesn't spend the first year or so having you learn the foundations
Are you sure?

OP should learn fundamentals and 3d programs. He should choose school that will help him with subjects that are harder to master on your own.
And I think that it's harder to learn 3d programs on your own than to learn fundamentals on your own. Because of that, OP should go to the school he mentioned and learn how to draw, about color theory, composition etc in his free time.


>>526515
>search for people like Frank Tzeng then go to his likes page to see who else is good. You must emulate or be even better than these people to get a job
Aren't you exaggerating a little?
Pic related.
>>
>>526976
>And I think that it's harder to learn 3d programs on your own than to learn fundamentals on your own.

that's completely backwards (and wrong). learning to use programs is rather trivial to do on your own. developing your basic artistic skills isn't. you will get so much more out of foundations art studies through taking classes where you'll get feedback and critique from professors and classmates. truthfully this does help with 3d as well, but it's easier to do on your own and get that feedback from online spaces. you don't really get good education and feedback when it comes to foundational art studies online. also if you can't teach yourself how to use various software packages, you aren't going to make it very far. professional 3d artists have to teach themselves new software, techniques, and technologies all the time. if that's something you can't manage, you aren't going to make it in the field



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