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Whats the best way to prepare a human model for damage modeling/texturing in a game?

Are there any resources that can point me in the right direction?
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>>518478
bump
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>damage
what does it mean?
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>>518540
Blood, scratches, bruises, missing limbs, pieces of clothing/armor being broken off, etc.
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>>518478
No special planing, most commonly you'll use mesh substitution at run-time to replace your undamaged skin with another one where your damage is present.

Example, PlayerA is running down a hallway when hit by 150mm tank shell that splits PlayerA into 2 parts.
In the next frame PlayerA's skin stop rendering, instead 2 new skinned meshes are spawned at the location of PlayerA, PlayerA_upperBody and PlayerA_lowerBody.
A script orients all the limbs to match those PlayerA had previous to the impact event and all bones inherit the same velocities the old skin had for ragdoll purposes.

These two new gore meshes now continues on, spawning particle blood etc from attatched particle systems.
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>>518545
So you simply model your skin like you would for any game that didn't have any graphical gore of this nature, then you take your finished mesh and start cutting it up and modifying it as needed to include the damaged region.
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>>518478
Here's "rendering wounds in Left 4 Dead 2", a paper on the subject:
http://www.valvesoftware.com/publications/2010/gdc2010_vlachos_l4d2wounds.pdf
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>>518545
>>518546
>>518547
This is some good stuff, thanks alot
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>>518544
>broken off
>missing limbs
hard as fuck to do if you don't have an existing tool inside your game engine that can do it for you.
Check out Valve's publications, they wrote one on how they did L4D2's zombie damage system.
http://www.valvesoftware.com/company/publications.html

In face, check out all of their publications, lots of interesting stuff.
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>>518579
>>518547
well fuck, I can't read.
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>>518544
Lots of questions, lots of solutions.
>Blood scratches, bruises,
This is typically decal work, or the inclusion of extra texture layers for each blood splatter or bruise. Decals are either simple quads that get plastered against the mesh, or a more complex enveloping mesh that's generated in runtime by a script or something.

Alternatively, if you can script the UV location on a mesh where a bruise or bloodsplatter should occur, then you can dump an extra texture on the mesh and offset it to the location of the wound. To be effective, this requires some really uniform UV work done on the original mesh.

>missing limbs,
>>518546
Consider the skeleton situation.

You can have a skeleton mesh that's composed of a single mesh. You can then take that exact same mesh and split it up into a collections of submeshes; like skulls, rib cage and spine, humerus, ulna and radius, femur, tibia and fibula, and feet.

Now you have two meshes. The first is your complete, single-body mesh that's for standard duty. When the skeleton actor dies or gets whacked, you just replace the single-body mesh with the multi-body mesh, and then do whatever works.

>pieces of clothing
Can be done a couple of ways. With mesh clothing, you probably make a battery of "damaged clothing" meshes. For simple texture meshes, you probably use a character shader that references at least three texture layers. The first layer is a skin layer, the second is a clothing layer, and the third is a stencil layer of sorts. When clothing in an area is damaged, the UV of that location of computed and a damage mark is blitted onto the stencil layer. When the shader is calculating how to color a fragment (pixel), it samples the skin texture wherever the stencil texture is filled out. Otherwise, it samples from the clothing texture. The math is pretty quick.

>armor being broken off
All of the above.
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>>518615
Thanks for the info, It's nice to see this thread is still getting quality replies.



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