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Why do people say you need to learn how to draw to do 3D? I mean, I completely understand learning how to build, but if you know how to build well what's the point of knowing how to draw?
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Drawing incapsulates a lot of skills you need
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>>509489
Like?

If you're talking about shape recognition, light knowledge, anatomy and the kind that's a visual art skill, and it is definitely not tied to drawing.

For instance, I hear a lot of people saying that drawing is good for composition, but that doesn't make any sense because I can simply have a few simple 3d assets I use to prepare a scene.
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Stop listening to what "people say" and just fucking get on with it you dumbass
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>>509496
I'm not an idiot, and this concerns me. I know very well I might be wrong.
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why do people post this same tired ass question everyday?
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>>509499
Because they don't know the answers...
This is not hard man.
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>>509500
Because 3d is just a tool, like a pencil is, if an artist can do it with a pencil he can do it with a software minus the insane amount of time that might go into it like in animation where every frame has to be drawn in traditional animation as compared to 3d where its just controling the key elements and then letting the computer deal with the repetitive stuff. An example is where i saw a master clay modeling artist who has been doing clay modeling for decades and then this guy learned a littlebit of of zbrush and some basic sculpting tools in it. The first ever 3d sculpt he made was a hand of an old person...and it looked so good veteran 3d artists were left in awe. He did in like 5or6 hrs and if it was properly rendered, there is no way you can tell its a render, thats how photo realistic it was.The pic is still out there if you can find it. The lesson is if you can do it with a pencil you can do it better with a 3d software. The principles of art are always the same, only the tools change. Drawing simply the concept while in 3d the advanced tools will distract you for example a person who can draw well will know the purpose of most tools in a painting software because hes don it with real painting where as if someone goes streight to the software you wont know the workflow or the plain basics of painting that you are supposed to know.It makes learning harder.
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>>509501
>drawing simply the concepts
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>>509502
>>drawing simplify the concepts
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>>509501
Please use commas next time, that was kind of hard to read.

But yeah, I can see that. Still, I think that's hardly a reason to say that you must learn how to draw first. I think even more importantly than that is that all the major concepts of making visual art (lighting, construction, etc.), are already taught extensively in the context of drawing, since it is simply an older craft. Still, I cannot see how drawing (as in, making the lines you want), would be beneficial to you when modeling. If one could study form and lighting and everything else in 3D without being distracted by things like subdivisions and other "turd polishers", I don't know why they shouldn't. If anything, I would say the learning path would be a bit different: since planes are harder to make than lines (at least at first), you would have to learn how to work with your tools first AND ONLY THEN learn how visual arts work, but then again, I think this is hardly a problem. After you have learned your tool you can do normal studies like you would with 2D.
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If someone asks if they need to learn to draw for (insert-digital-content-creative-degree), they need to change careers asap.
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>>509508
Meaning that?
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The answer to your question, OP, is the very same one as to the old old question: Does size matter?
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>>509484
Because drawing, believe it or not, requires you to think in 3D. Things like perspective and shit are important.

If you can't draw you either can't or aren't very good at thinking in 3D, which will make working in 3D that much harder.

Not to mention if you can't draw, doing anything original is going to be a pain in the ass since you won't be able to draw references for yourself and you'll have to freestyle it all the way through which ends up making the final result suffer more often than not.
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>>509495
Why do you ask a question that you don't want to hear the answer? You clearly seem to think you have it all figured out, so what's the point of this thread, and don't tell me you want to know because if you wanted to know you wouldn't reply with explanations why it doesn't make sense, you think your shit works, work it and fuck off.
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>>509509
Are you afraid to draw or something? Putting up your sketch in front of others - seeing how mediocre it really is among your peers.

I sure you will give us the millionth iteration of Gundam in your portfolio.
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>>509484
>I completely understand learning how to build, but if you know how to build well what's the point of knowing how to draw?

If your intention is to stay at the bottom of the cad-modeling-barrel, you are on the right path.
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>>509484
Because you'll never make anything good AND original if you don't.
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>>509484

OP I started learning to drawing, tradionally only, jan last year... I started to lear to draw for two reason... 1). I always wanted to see things drawn no one else draws often or at all, or, things I want to see like character with another character whatever. 2). To get good enough not just to draw, but draw digitally, paint traditionally as well as, to take these new skills into 3D modeling and animation.

So I have basis on lighting, how things work, how anatomy works. How it all fits together. I've not seen a single 3D artist, whose good... That didn't take some time to draw. You don't need to be a top teir artist, if that's your concern... I've seen people who draw like 13 year olds produce good quality 3D work... ( I however want to be as good as I can be comfortably mostly, not so much being the best artist. As there is no such thing. )

Makes sense to me, is it taking a while? Sure, I'm 32 and didn't have any goals when I was younger, just work, watching anime and thats it... Now I'm making things and though I am no where near pro skills yet. I went from stick figures to maybe a high-school level of skills with obvious ability to know my mistakes but still learning to smooth all of it out. And I merely put 30 - 45 minutes per day. Not hard, if you can spare more time... In the time its taken me you could do it in 6 months... Drive... into what you really want.
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>>509495
You can prepare a fuckton of simple 3d assets but you will never be as fast as me when sketching/ scribbling concepts.
You will never model as fast as someone who knows exactly what he wants and has prepared himself with concepts/drawings etc.
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>>509538
>Because drawing, believe it or not, requires you to think in 3D.
No shit, but why is this relevant?

>If you can't draw you either can't or aren't very good at thinking in 3D
Drawing is also a lot more than just thinking in 3D.

> doing anything original is going to be a pain in the ass since you won't be able to draw references for yourself
Why would you need to draw references? The point of knowing anatomy and lighting and things like that is to detach yourself from reference. If you only draw (and model) from reference you would simply need good positional awareness.

>>509539
>Why do you ask a question that you don't want to hear the answer?
In this post you didn't give any sort of explanation as to why I was wrong. You basically just called me a retard. Am I just to accept what you tell me without thinking at all?

>>509570
Nice strawman man. To be honest I have no interest in 3dcg (at least for now), I prefer drawing, it's fun, but I was just really really curious because I hear this all the time in CGsociety for instance, and I just don't get it.

>>509649
I assume if you have a concept in your head you won't need to scribble a lot to pose a model the way you want and then tweak it to find a nice composition. Again, those things are simply not tied to drawing or painting.

Basically every reply in this thread is >>509589

>>509609
>So I have basis on lighting, how things work, how anatomy works.
So ok, what you're telling me is that you don't need to deal with those things in 3d so you can't practice them in 3d? Come on mang.
>I've seen people who draw like 13 year olds produce good quality 3D
What do you even mean by this? So they CAN'T draw?
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Drawing seems like it would be important to learn first, because if trained properly, you'll learn form. You can say you are learning form by doing 3D work or sculpture, but by learning form from drawing, you're learning about 3d space and perspective, and how and why things look the way they do to the eye. Proportions and perspective are probably important to learn before diving into CG.
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>>509484
You don't NEED to, but being good at one discipline will inevitably make you a better artist at the other one. A person who has drawn all their life can probably put out an ok sculpture after spending some time familiarizing themselves with the tools because the foundamental knowledge is the same.

If you've been practicing sculpture for a while and see reduced gains from your studying you can switch it up with traditional 2d drawing and it will help you get better. The same applies going from 2d to 3d.
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when you actually learn to draw from imagination you are required to grind out fundamentals that help with SEEING and knowing how things are shaped from total practice, these things help 3D also.
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yeah sure, just like math makes you better at programming

laughingwhores.jpg
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>>509495
> that's a visual art skill, and it is definitely not tied to drawing.

I... wat? drawing *is* how you learn these skills. It's not the only way, sure, but it has traditionally been proven to be the fastest way.

Also, there are a lot of other skills you need that you will develop with drawing; hand-eye-loop coordination, drafting skills (useful for 3D sculpting), ..., and, maybe most important of all, since you can't draw photo-realistically, it teaches you to abstract, comic-ize, caricaturize, stylize ...
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>>512070
>tfw I always espouse the value of Linear Algebra, statistics, and calculus to computer science majors
>they never believe me
webdevs, the lot of them.
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>>512215

you don't even need to know that shit and you can earn six figures if you are good
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Basically if you're a good old-school artist, you're likely also just as good or ever better in the 3d department. That does not go both ways.

Unless you're a special snowflake.
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>>509484
Because when you create shapes you need to be able to read or think of shapes, hold them in your mind and replicate them accurately.

Drawing teaches you this the fastest because it's so unforgiving. When sculpting or modelling you can nudge shit back and forth and reach the right curvature
by over-aiming and correcting and correcting and correcting. Drawing forces you to get in the habit of throwing accurate lines fast and efficient.
As such it trains your art skills the fastest and makes you the best artist you can be in the shortest amount of time.

People who don't master their basics will never take off the training wheels and keep using crutches indefinitely.
Like how half the people of /3/ still dicking around with front/side image planes thinking it can ever work out for them.
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>>509484
>Why do people say you need to learn how to draw to do 3D
you don't really need to learn but it is a helpful asset.
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So where do I begin learning how to draw? I'm in college at the moment, so can I just enroll in, say, art 101? Is that really a class to start from with no experience at all?
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>>512448
I took an art class, really does help if your skill is at zero.
granted you have a decent teacher.
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>>512449
So you're saying drawing can be learned. What is the adequate level of drawing that lives up to /3/'s expectations that benefits in 3D, though? From what i've seen, it's just concepts and sketches.
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>>509484
try building a house without plans. it will be trial and error until you make something out of it.
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I work at a big studio. It helps a lot. Especially if you want a career.
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>>512450
For hard surface objects I've found it's the other way around. Modeling will help your drawing greatly. Drawing has almost no bearing on modeling them. Just look at a photo if you are having trouble.

The only drawing courses I've taken that have helped my modeling are human figure. It forced me to break down the human body into shapes and proportions, and learning anatomy and muscle groups really helps with realism and speed in character modeling.

Also you occasionally get a hot girl as the nude model, which is always a plus.



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