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Computer Graphics/Computer Animation/3D Animation vs Computer Science?

I'd like to be on the more creative side of say a game, or a movie. But do they usually go without consistent work?
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go for animation
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>>507818
Any reasoning? I've read often that people might choose Computer Science while doing animation as a hobby.
But.. I'm not sure it this would be too much a headache.
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>>507847
Computer SCIENCE is the "science" of computing. Best not to waste your time with that unless you want to at best work for google and refine search times by .2 seconds
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Software Engineering.
CS is a meme degree for research, and the art industry is saturated dogshit where you not only need to excel but you also get overworked.
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>>507850
A computer science degree is one of the few degrees that can actually help you in the game and film industry. If you're going for technical roles like programming, rigging, rendering, pipeline management, etc...
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>>507912
Getting a degree will never help. If you want to learn cg, get some books and watch some vids. Its not a very complicated field, and now its dominated by mo cap and photogrammetry so there's that.
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>>507850
My only fear is that as one other anon said the market may be saturated for the animation. Most companies look at reels instead of degrees anyhow right? Though, obviously they wont hire you with a shitty reel and a degree.

When I try to search for alternatives for 3D Ani/Computer Graphics all that comes up is video games and movies with the vague mention of other careers. However most sites delve into the entertainment as thats what most want to hear about.

Obviously I'd be willing to commit full hearted. But is this as much a gamble as a film or art degree? Or will the market improve with say 3D Printing, if animating doesnt work out?

Thanks.
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>>507814
If you ask questions like "can I get consistent" work you probably don't have the passion to be good enough in the first place senpai.
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>>507814
If you want to learn how to be an artist? Go for animation. If you want to actually get a job then go for computer science
.
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>>507917
>>507918
Yeah. I hate to seem kind of skimpy on something that requires full dedication. But I'd also like some sort of a realistic skeleton to look at before I jump ship, you know?

Just curious if anyone has gone through the animation route and their thoughts, or if they thought it was better to opt for an alternative route.
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>>507850
>"waste" your time learning how the tech you build you models with works
Your attitude prevents you from ever going above mediocre.
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>>507914
Try reading what I said. When you're talking about ARTISTIC roles, yes, no fucking degrees matter. But when you're talking about TECHNICAL roles, degrees do actually help, and job postings for this roles will say "a computer science degree is a plus" or something along those lines. Technical skill is easily quantifiable while artistic skill is simply "what you see is what you get". A computer science degrees lets them know you've met some standardized criteria that shows you truly have a good understanding of programming concepts, something no real demo-reel can do.
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>>507923
>thinks you cant learn if you aren't in a degree program
lol r u 12?
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>>507924
>. A computer science degrees lets them know you've met some standardized criteria that shows you truly have a good understanding of programming concepts, something no real demo-reel can do.
A CS degree is a piece of paper. If you want to show that you've met standardized criteria you want to write a program and then share it with some other person and see if it catches on. This is how you get into and make it in any industry - with your own work catching on. Are you one of those people that needs guidance in the form of a lecture hall and being in a dormatory and going to an advisor and getting an internship? If so, you'll never be more than entry level in this. Also you'll have wasted a lot of time
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>>507927
>Are you one of those people that needs guidance in the form of a lecture hall and being in a dormatory and going to an advisor and getting an internship?
I actually work in the industry as a 3D artist, and no, I do not need guidance, I learn fine on my own, learned to model and program on my own. But if I wanted to be a programming, I would most definitely go to get a CS degree simply for the certification, which is all I've been saying it's good for. I never once implied it's the best way to learn how to program, so stop being such an autistic twat. As someone actually active in the industry, I can tell you with utmost certainty that simply having a CS degree will greatly put you ahead of other potential hires when it comes to TECHNICAL roles. For anything else, yes, I am agreeing, a piece of paper means shit all, you seem to keep ignoring the fact I've said that multiple times now.
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>>507955
i see you're quite proud of that degree then, filthy millennial, you are right in that having a degree is one good way to get a nice job but for animation and "le arts" what matters is that you dedicate to your job, what>>507927 is an even better way to land an even nicer job since your work has a following and a reputation in where it is assumed that you give dedication to what you do so dont go "arggh i already told you why dont you listen to me cant you see im right?" i dont give a fuck you are in the industry right now, they could fire you even tomorrow
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>>507955
Not this guy, but what he says is true. A degree helps in both situations, it opens doors a bit wider. Artistic roles are heavily reliant on a solid portfolio, and a degree is less important for them. CS is a little different.

>>507977
Your work doesn't need a following or a reputation, it just needs to be very good and it needs to show a potential employer that you know what you're doing. And I can tell you this, attitude is a HUGE factor as well. I do not hire egos, I hire team players. Under tight deadlines and lots and lots of overtime, nobody wants to work with an ego maniac.
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>>508029
>Your work doesn't need a following or a reputation, it just needs to be very good
If your work doesnt have both of these, you'll never be very good. At best you'll be someone with a thread up on polycount making fanart

>And I can tell you this, attitude is a HUGE factor as well. I do not hire egos, I hire team players. Under tight deadlines and lots and lots of overtime, nobody wants to work with an ego maniac.
This really means nothing since we can't judge your personality and also people will put their best face forward for a week or two and then their real personality will come out
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>>508033
I have no following, I work at one of the most well known game studios in the world. Hint: East Coast, Raleigh NC

And you are right, it is hard to tell who is a dick and who is not, and that's why we do multiple rounds of interviews and with different interviewers. We also pay close attention to how many team projects a person has done, and what the outcome of those was. In some cases, we even give extended tours and let candidates sit in with employees for part of the day and observe. All of this is to judge how a person will fit in.
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>>508125
>East Coast, Raleigh NC
le epic gaems?
idk how they work there and if it's "nice" (that is if you do work in epic games, i just gave it a raw guess) but for what they've done and what i've read it sounds like a place i would like to go, fuck, i dont even know what i'll end up doing when i finish the career, i mean, i enjoy the things i do in university but no plans for the future
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>>508292
also, i consider myself quite antisocial, i mean, i guess i can work with other people and all and sometimes it does end with everyone doing an equal part and with a satisfactory result but most of the times (even the fuckers in the career are pulling this shit) i end up doing most of the work, not because i don't tell what i think but because they want to go with their ideas (as in, each one of them wants to go with their idea without thinking of consequences, requirements etc...) so i might not end up working in a studio sadly
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>>508125
>I work at one of the most well known game studios in the world. Hint: East Coast, Raleigh NC
epic doesnt make even decent games though. Their unreal engine is also poorly written and not free so theres that.
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Revisiting this days later..
The thread seemed to have derailed. And I didn't quite get a clear answer.
So the best option would be to do computer science, and work on Animation & Graphics on the side? The degree means nothing?
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>>507926
That works with fields like 3D, but CS is far too complex for you to teach yourself, and even if you succeed it will take you at least twice the time. CS != programming.
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>>508125
>Hint: East Coast, Raleigh NC
I hope you weren't one of the guys who had to model the abysmal character designs for UT3 or Gears.
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>>508604
>but CS is far too complex for you to teach yourself
what is your end goal in "teaching yourself CS"?
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>>508609
To be able to do the exact same things exactly as fast as someone who studied it.
I'm not saying it's not possible, I'm just saying if you succeed it will have taken you at least twice as long getting there.
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>>508614
>To be able to do the exact same things exactly as fast as someone who studied it.
but what does this actually mean? And how will you measure it?
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>>508615
>And how will you measure it?
That is exactly the problem. When you study something like CS, you're measured (although with debatable quality) through tests you have to pass. When you teach it to yourself, 1. no employer can be sure of whether you employ a skill set or not, because no one will have you write all the tests for them (test code is different) and 2. you can't be sure yourself.

Of course you can learn abstract stuff like formal grammars or how to mathematically prove your code works using Wikipedia or Youtube tutorials like it's usually done in 3D, but you'll have a damn hard time without someone to answer your exact questions. Just think about how many people come here to get their questions answered and it usually takes one or two sentences. It's nothing like that in CS.
For most useful study fields, people don't go there for the lectures, they go there for the tutorials so they can ask questions.
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I went the computer science route and regret it deeply, I wish I became a 3D artist instead.

Too late for me now.



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